Proposal / Submission Type

Peer Reviewed Paper

Location

St. Paul, Minnesota

Start Date

21-5-2010 8:30 AM

Abstract

This paper introduces the Digital Records Forensics project, a research endeavour located at the University of British Columbia in Canada and aimed at the development of a new science resulting from the integration of digital forensics with diplomatics, archival science, information science and the law of evidence, and of an interdisciplinary graduate degree program, called Digital Records Forensics Studies, directed to professionals working for law enforcement agencies, legal firms, courts, and all kind of institutions and business that require their services. The program anticipates the need for organizations to become “forensically ready,” defined by John Tan as “maximizing the ability of an environment to collect credible digital evidence while minimizing the cost of an incident response (Tan, 2001).” The paper argues the need for such a program, describes its nature and content, and proposes ways of delivering it.

Keywords: digital records, records authenticity, graduate education, record theory, records forensics science, records forensic discipline, forensic readiness, Digital Records Forensics, digital preservation

 
May 21st, 8:30 AM

Digital Records Forensics: A New Science and Academic Program for Forensic Readiness

St. Paul, Minnesota

This paper introduces the Digital Records Forensics project, a research endeavour located at the University of British Columbia in Canada and aimed at the development of a new science resulting from the integration of digital forensics with diplomatics, archival science, information science and the law of evidence, and of an interdisciplinary graduate degree program, called Digital Records Forensics Studies, directed to professionals working for law enforcement agencies, legal firms, courts, and all kind of institutions and business that require their services. The program anticipates the need for organizations to become “forensically ready,” defined by John Tan as “maximizing the ability of an environment to collect credible digital evidence while minimizing the cost of an incident response (Tan, 2001).” The paper argues the need for such a program, describes its nature and content, and proposes ways of delivering it.

Keywords: digital records, records authenticity, graduate education, record theory, records forensics science, records forensic discipline, forensic readiness, Digital Records Forensics, digital preservation