Proposal / Submission Type

Peer Reviewed Paper

Location

Daytona Beach, Florida

Start Date

20-5-2015 3:00 PM

Abstract

Hackers pose a continuous and unrelenting threat to organizations. Industry and academic researchers alike can benefit from a greater understanding of how hackers engage in criminal behavior. A limiting factor of hacker research is the inability to verify that self-proclaimed hackers participating in research actually possess their purported knowledge and skills. This paper presents current work in developing and validating a conceptual-expertise based tool that can be used to discriminate between novice and expert hackers. The implications of this work are promising since behavioral information systems researchers operating in the information security space will directly benefit from the validation of this tool.

Keywords: hacker ability, conceptual expertise, skill measurement

Comments

Session Chair: Gareth Davies, University of South Wales

 
May 20th, 3:00 PM

Measuring Hacking Ability Using a Conceptual Expertise Task

Daytona Beach, Florida

Hackers pose a continuous and unrelenting threat to organizations. Industry and academic researchers alike can benefit from a greater understanding of how hackers engage in criminal behavior. A limiting factor of hacker research is the inability to verify that self-proclaimed hackers participating in research actually possess their purported knowledge and skills. This paper presents current work in developing and validating a conceptual-expertise based tool that can be used to discriminate between novice and expert hackers. The implications of this work are promising since behavioral information systems researchers operating in the information security space will directly benefit from the validation of this tool.

Keywords: hacker ability, conceptual expertise, skill measurement