Topic Area

HUMAN FACTORS

Abstract

The United States military is committed to the development of complete autonomy in unmanned vehicles, including armed unmanned aerial systems (UAS). The design and deployment of autonomous lethal UAS raises ethical issues that have implications for human factors. System design, procedures, and training will be impacted by the advent of autonomous lethal UAS. This paper will define relevant vocabulary, review the literature on robot ethics as it applies to the military setting, discuss various perspectives in the research community, address levels of UAS autonomy, and discuss implications for operator training, responsibility, and human-machine interaction. Familiarity with these ethical issues and their repercussions will prepare human factors practitioners for the challenges created by this developing technology.

Start Date

16-1-2015 1:30 PM

End Date

16-1-2015 3:00 PM

A3IR presentation.pdf (695 kB)
Presentation Slides

 
Jan 16th, 1:30 PM Jan 16th, 3:00 PM

Human Factors Considerations in Autonomous Lethal Unmanned Aerial Systems

The United States military is committed to the development of complete autonomy in unmanned vehicles, including armed unmanned aerial systems (UAS). The design and deployment of autonomous lethal UAS raises ethical issues that have implications for human factors. System design, procedures, and training will be impacted by the advent of autonomous lethal UAS. This paper will define relevant vocabulary, review the literature on robot ethics as it applies to the military setting, discuss various perspectives in the research community, address levels of UAS autonomy, and discuss implications for operator training, responsibility, and human-machine interaction. Familiarity with these ethical issues and their repercussions will prepare human factors practitioners for the challenges created by this developing technology.