Title

Mid Morning Concurrent Sessions: Human Factors: Human Error and Cockpit Automation: Presentation: The Effect of a Midpoint Marking on Pilot Decision Making While Landing

Location

San Marcos Ballroom B

Topic Area

HUMAN FACTORS

Abstract

The general aviation industry continues to experience landing overruns due in part to pilots touching down beyond the midpoint of the available runway. In some landing overruns, pilots were unaware that the midpoint was reached and nonetheless “forced” the landing instead of implementing the go-around/aborted landing procedure. Incident reports have confirmed that forced landings were coupled with frequent overruns. Over the years airport operators and pilots have occasionally reported that knowing the location of the midpoint of runways would help them to minimize such incidents/accidents. There is a greater tendency for landing overruns at airports that primarily serve general aviation operations with runway lengths less than 4200 feet in length and being utilized by student pilots and those pilots that primarily fly on the weekends only. In order to determine the effect of potential markings that can assist in mitigating this risk, the research team has conducted a simulator study with National Intercollegiate Flying Association (NIFA) competitors at three separate recent competitions. This paper will highlight the results of that interaction and discuss the next steps in accordance with an ongoing project.

Start Date

16-1-2016 9:30 AM

End Date

16-1-2016 10:45 AM

Other Format Preference

Faculty Poster

Chair/Note/Host

Co-Chairs: Clint Balog, ERAU-WW; Erin Bowen, ERAU-PC

Keywords

Aviation, Decision Making, Runway Marking, Runway Overrun, Landing, Pilot Decision Making, Decision Making

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Jan 16th, 9:30 AM Jan 16th, 10:45 AM

Mid Morning Concurrent Sessions: Human Factors: Human Error and Cockpit Automation: Presentation: The Effect of a Midpoint Marking on Pilot Decision Making While Landing

San Marcos Ballroom B

The general aviation industry continues to experience landing overruns due in part to pilots touching down beyond the midpoint of the available runway. In some landing overruns, pilots were unaware that the midpoint was reached and nonetheless “forced” the landing instead of implementing the go-around/aborted landing procedure. Incident reports have confirmed that forced landings were coupled with frequent overruns. Over the years airport operators and pilots have occasionally reported that knowing the location of the midpoint of runways would help them to minimize such incidents/accidents. There is a greater tendency for landing overruns at airports that primarily serve general aviation operations with runway lengths less than 4200 feet in length and being utilized by student pilots and those pilots that primarily fly on the weekends only. In order to determine the effect of potential markings that can assist in mitigating this risk, the research team has conducted a simulator study with National Intercollegiate Flying Association (NIFA) competitors at three separate recent competitions. This paper will highlight the results of that interaction and discuss the next steps in accordance with an ongoing project.