Title

Late Morning Concurrent Sessions: Critical Issues: Presentation: Are We Facing a Pilot Shortage?

Location

San Tan Ballroom

Topic Area

COMMERCIAL AVIATION

Other Topic Area

Pilot Shortage

Abstract

Are We Facing a Pilot Shortage?

Timothy S. Clifton

Dr. Jacqueline R. Luedtke, Mentor

Embry Riddle Aeronautical University

Prescott, Arizona

ABSTRACT

This case study research project was designed to depict the state of the aviation industry in regards to pilot availability. It seeks to answer questions such as whether we are facing a pilot shortage and, if so, what airlines can do to prevent the pilot shortage. The answers to these questions are crucial for the aviation industry as a whole; there is a strong need for pilots to provide transportation to more than eight million people who fly every single day. Methods of research included previous case study evaluations and analysis; internet research using aviation organizations such as AOPA and Airline Pilot Central helped provide the specific numbers of pilots currently active as well as hiring projections. In addition, current airline pilots and recruiters were interviewed in order to gain first-hand information. In researching the question regarding whether or not we are facing a pilot shortage, the answer appears to depend on how one looks at it. Major airlines have quite a large pool of regional airline captains from which to hire; these airlines are not having difficulty hiring pilots. The regional airlines are the ones who are struggling. From the analysis of the research data, it becomes clear that if regional airlines need to hire more pilots, they will have to raise the starting pay from the low $20,000 range; not enough people are willing to spend close to $100,000 in training costs to start at such a low wage. If the regional industry as a whole focused on improving incentives for new pilots such as increased wages and quality of life for starting pilots, the research shows this would be a step in the right direction in curbing the shortage.

Start Date

16-1-2016 11:00 AM

End Date

16-1-2016 12:15 PM

Chair/Note/Host

Chair: Doug Drury, University of South Australia

Keywords

Aviation, Pilot, Pilot Shortage, Aviation Trends

Share

Import Event to Google Calendar

COinS
 
Jan 16th, 11:00 AM Jan 16th, 12:15 PM

Late Morning Concurrent Sessions: Critical Issues: Presentation: Are We Facing a Pilot Shortage?

San Tan Ballroom

Are We Facing a Pilot Shortage?

Timothy S. Clifton

Dr. Jacqueline R. Luedtke, Mentor

Embry Riddle Aeronautical University

Prescott, Arizona

ABSTRACT

This case study research project was designed to depict the state of the aviation industry in regards to pilot availability. It seeks to answer questions such as whether we are facing a pilot shortage and, if so, what airlines can do to prevent the pilot shortage. The answers to these questions are crucial for the aviation industry as a whole; there is a strong need for pilots to provide transportation to more than eight million people who fly every single day. Methods of research included previous case study evaluations and analysis; internet research using aviation organizations such as AOPA and Airline Pilot Central helped provide the specific numbers of pilots currently active as well as hiring projections. In addition, current airline pilots and recruiters were interviewed in order to gain first-hand information. In researching the question regarding whether or not we are facing a pilot shortage, the answer appears to depend on how one looks at it. Major airlines have quite a large pool of regional airline captains from which to hire; these airlines are not having difficulty hiring pilots. The regional airlines are the ones who are struggling. From the analysis of the research data, it becomes clear that if regional airlines need to hire more pilots, they will have to raise the starting pay from the low $20,000 range; not enough people are willing to spend close to $100,000 in training costs to start at such a low wage. If the regional industry as a whole focused on improving incentives for new pilots such as increased wages and quality of life for starting pilots, the research shows this would be a step in the right direction in curbing the shortage.