Abstract Title

Cockpit Interactions and the Evolution of Pilot Monitoring Concept

Faculty Mentor Name

Cass D. Howell, Ed.D.

Faculty Mentor's Email Address

howellc@erau.edu

Abstract

Recent analysis show an increase in Loss of Control-inflight (LOC-I) as well as Controlled Flight into Terrain (CFIT) events, both of which could potentially be preventable by identifying and mitigating threats early on. Human nature makes it difficult to avoid errors in a cockpit. In this context, it has been discussed that effective monitoring can be, in many occasions, the only effective barrier to stop an chain of events, and prevent an accident. In this regard, it appears crucial to re-think the approach to monitoring training and reput the human entity at the core of the safety system. Major actor of the aviation industry have recently gathered (2013 Conference, Royal Aeronautical Society) to share thoughts and methods to better incorporate the Pilot Monitoring (PM) function in crewmembers workflow. It is now considered crucial to promote monitoring as equally important as other functions on board. NASA is conducting research on underlying human factors of the PM role and Airlines have started to push toward a greater implication of the Monitoring role in training scenarios. The incorporation of the Active Monitoring Concept and the development of monitoring skills training to be implemented during Line-Oriented Flight Training are examples of evolution. This paper will present the latest trends in PM training and identify some actions taken by the industry to enhance aviation safety in the future through enhanced monitoring.

Location

College of Aviation Atrium, Daytona Beach Campus

Start Date

30-11-2015 3:49 PM

End Date

30-11-2015 3:59 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 30th, 3:49 PM Nov 30th, 3:59 PM

Cockpit Interactions and the Evolution of Pilot Monitoring Concept

College of Aviation Atrium, Daytona Beach Campus

Recent analysis show an increase in Loss of Control-inflight (LOC-I) as well as Controlled Flight into Terrain (CFIT) events, both of which could potentially be preventable by identifying and mitigating threats early on. Human nature makes it difficult to avoid errors in a cockpit. In this context, it has been discussed that effective monitoring can be, in many occasions, the only effective barrier to stop an chain of events, and prevent an accident. In this regard, it appears crucial to re-think the approach to monitoring training and reput the human entity at the core of the safety system. Major actor of the aviation industry have recently gathered (2013 Conference, Royal Aeronautical Society) to share thoughts and methods to better incorporate the Pilot Monitoring (PM) function in crewmembers workflow. It is now considered crucial to promote monitoring as equally important as other functions on board. NASA is conducting research on underlying human factors of the PM role and Airlines have started to push toward a greater implication of the Monitoring role in training scenarios. The incorporation of the Active Monitoring Concept and the development of monitoring skills training to be implemented during Line-Oriented Flight Training are examples of evolution. This paper will present the latest trends in PM training and identify some actions taken by the industry to enhance aviation safety in the future through enhanced monitoring.