Title

The Weather and Air Traffic Management Integration Course in the Graduate Aeronautics Program at Embry-Riddle

Document Type

Conference Proceeding

Publication/Presentation Date

1-25-2011

Abstract/Description

One year ago, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University added a new Area of Concentration (AOC) in Aviation Meteorology to the Master of Science in Aeronautics (MSA) program at the Daytona Beach, Florida campus. As part of the preparation for the start of this program, an experimental graduate seminar in Weather and Air Traffic Integration was taught over the summer, which attracted graduate students with backgrounds in commercial and private aviation, applied meteorology, and engineering physics. The purpose of this course was to introduce the students to the concept of weather and air traffic integration as it currently exists and is being planned for NextGen. The course goals are outlined below:

1. Explain the concept of weather and air traffic integration as it relates to the NextGen program. 2. Summarize the primary objectives of weather and air traffic integration in the NextGen program. 3. Summarize the objectives of several research and development projects currently being carried out to support the objectives of weather and air traffic integration in the NextGen program. 4. Summarize the main issues surrounding weather and air traffic integration in the NextGen program. 5. Complete a term paper on a topic relating to weather and air traffic integration and present its results to the class.

The course began with a lecture-based review of aviation meteorology and an introduction to weather and air traffic integration as it is currently being accomplished in the NAS. This was necessary in order to bring everyone in the class up to a common level of understanding. The course then transitioned to a student-led seminar discussion format, during which time the class read and discussed papers on NextGen projects/concepts such as ADS-B, SWIM, RNAV/RNP, NNEW, CDM, and others. The final projects covered topics chosen by the students, such as CWSU History and Proposed Consolidation, TBO, CIWS, Operation of the ATCSCC's National Playbook, and Enhanced Vision Systems, reflecting the diversity of student academic backgrounds and interests. The capstone of the course was a visit and tour of the Jacksonville ARTCC. The class spoke with CWSU meteorologists, TMU personnel, and briefly sat with sector controllers, all of which allowed them to see and learn firsthand about weather and air traffic integration in today's NAS. This field trip complemented the academic treatment of weather and air traffic integration, and gave them a unique perspective on the NextGen projects covered in seminar. Student feedback from the seminar was very favorable, and as a result, we are considering making this course a permanent, required part of the Aviation Meteorology AOC.

Location

Seattle, WA