Abstract Title

Simulation Research to Identify the Ideal Crew for Exploration Space Missions

Authors' Class Standing

Victoria Barkley, Junior Sarah Glista, Junior Nishant Karvinkop, Junior Shanggar Ganesh, Junior Margaret Micinski, Sophomore

Lead Presenter's Name

Victoria Barkley

Faculty Mentor Name

Jason Kring

Abstract

The composition of the crew for long-duration exploration space missions can affect how the crew functions and ultimately performs; however evidence on the optimal mixture is limited. To study this relationship, we propose a series of experiments to determine which crew compositions produce the highest level of performance. In three different phases, 4-person teams will conduct simulated missions in an enclosed habitat called the Mobile Extreme Environment Research Station (MEERS). Depending on the phase, teams will spend either 2, 4 or 6 days performing a variety of tasks including research projects and simulated extravehicular activities and also complete a battery of behavioral measures on stress and mood. We will then compare how a crew’s specific composition in terms of gender, personality, age, and national culture correlates with measures of performance. Results will show which mixture of these variables is associated with better levels of performance in a simulated space mission.

Location

Center for Faith & Spirituality

Start Date

9-4-2014 1:00 PM

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Apr 9th, 1:00 PM

Simulation Research to Identify the Ideal Crew for Exploration Space Missions

Center for Faith & Spirituality

The composition of the crew for long-duration exploration space missions can affect how the crew functions and ultimately performs; however evidence on the optimal mixture is limited. To study this relationship, we propose a series of experiments to determine which crew compositions produce the highest level of performance. In three different phases, 4-person teams will conduct simulated missions in an enclosed habitat called the Mobile Extreme Environment Research Station (MEERS). Depending on the phase, teams will spend either 2, 4 or 6 days performing a variety of tasks including research projects and simulated extravehicular activities and also complete a battery of behavioral measures on stress and mood. We will then compare how a crew’s specific composition in terms of gender, personality, age, and national culture correlates with measures of performance. Results will show which mixture of these variables is associated with better levels of performance in a simulated space mission.