Abstract Title

Investigating Aeroponics, Space Suit Design, and Team Performance at a Mars Analog

Authors' Class Standing

Chui-Minn Lee, senior Carolyn Newton, junior Chelsea Iwig, graduate student Antoine Juhel, graduate student Shyamal Patel, graduate Carlos Giraldo, junior Eric Watkins, junior Elise Reeves, junior

Lead Presenter's Name

Chui-Miin Lee

Faculty Mentor Name

Jason Kring

Abstract

Six students from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University simulated life on Mars for nearly 2 weeks at the Mars Desert Research Station to conduct behavioral and new space technology research at this isolated research center in Hanksville, Utah. Projects included: 1) validation of an aeroponics-based, plant growth system for long-duration spaceflight, 2) usability testing of prototype space suit components, 3) validation of a measure of crew function and interpersonal interactions, 4) monitoring sleep and activity levels before, during, and after isolation, and 5) measuring perceived stress levels associated with physical exercise. Although data analyses are ongoing, preliminary results indicate differences between crewmembers on perceived stress and crew function. Furthermore, studies of the new space technologies have continued throughout the Spring 2014 semester and will be reported.

Location

Center for Faith & Spirituality

Start Date

9-4-2014 1:00 PM

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Apr 9th, 1:00 PM

Investigating Aeroponics, Space Suit Design, and Team Performance at a Mars Analog

Center for Faith & Spirituality

Six students from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University simulated life on Mars for nearly 2 weeks at the Mars Desert Research Station to conduct behavioral and new space technology research at this isolated research center in Hanksville, Utah. Projects included: 1) validation of an aeroponics-based, plant growth system for long-duration spaceflight, 2) usability testing of prototype space suit components, 3) validation of a measure of crew function and interpersonal interactions, 4) monitoring sleep and activity levels before, during, and after isolation, and 5) measuring perceived stress levels associated with physical exercise. Although data analyses are ongoing, preliminary results indicate differences between crewmembers on perceived stress and crew function. Furthermore, studies of the new space technologies have continued throughout the Spring 2014 semester and will be reported.