Abstract Title

Applications of Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene in the Aerospace Industry

group

Authors' Class Standing

Keith Alvares - Senior Samit Jaiswal - Senior Kevin Wade - Graduate student Santhosh Loganathan - Graduate Student

Lead Presenter's Name

Keith Alvares

Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Virginie Rollin

Abstract

Carbon nanotubes and Graphene are an up and coming technology with multiple applications in mechanical and electrical industries. This research focuses on studying carbon nanotubes’ and graphene and the role they can play as an anti-icing agent. In our experiment we will first determine the electrical conductivity of the Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene, by knowing the electrical conductivity we can calculate the thermal conductivity using Wiedemann-Franz Law. The literature reveals that the electrical conductivity of carbon nanotubes (1x107 S/m) is far less to that of copper (6x107 S/m) and that is one of the main drawbacks in carbon nanotubes. The overall conductivity of a SWNT network is dominated by the existence of high resistance and tunneling/Schottky barriers at the intertube junctions in the network. Graphene is, basically, a single atomic layer of graphite; an abundant mineral which is an allotrope of carbon that is made up of very tightly bonded carbon atoms organized into a hexagonal lattice. One of the most unique features of graphene is that it has a zero-overlap semimetal with very high electrical conductivity. In this project, we aim to create a composite structure containing carbon nanotubes and/or graphene particles which can make the structure conductive enough to deice a wing. We expect to advance the current knowledge of de-icing systems for use in smaller aircrafts such as the Cessna 172 using carbon nanotubes and graphene.

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Applications of Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene in the Aerospace Industry

Carbon nanotubes and Graphene are an up and coming technology with multiple applications in mechanical and electrical industries. This research focuses on studying carbon nanotubes’ and graphene and the role they can play as an anti-icing agent. In our experiment we will first determine the electrical conductivity of the Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene, by knowing the electrical conductivity we can calculate the thermal conductivity using Wiedemann-Franz Law. The literature reveals that the electrical conductivity of carbon nanotubes (1x107 S/m) is far less to that of copper (6x107 S/m) and that is one of the main drawbacks in carbon nanotubes. The overall conductivity of a SWNT network is dominated by the existence of high resistance and tunneling/Schottky barriers at the intertube junctions in the network. Graphene is, basically, a single atomic layer of graphite; an abundant mineral which is an allotrope of carbon that is made up of very tightly bonded carbon atoms organized into a hexagonal lattice. One of the most unique features of graphene is that it has a zero-overlap semimetal with very high electrical conductivity. In this project, we aim to create a composite structure containing carbon nanotubes and/or graphene particles which can make the structure conductive enough to deice a wing. We expect to advance the current knowledge of de-icing systems for use in smaller aircrafts such as the Cessna 172 using carbon nanotubes and graphene.