Abstract Title

Hydroponics at the Common Ground CSA

Author Information

J.R. AndersonFollow

group

Authors' Class Standing

J.R. Anderson Kimberly Harrelson Dylan Pratt Rachel Sydow Rebecca Rohmeyer Meghan Menz

Lead Presenter's Name

J.R. Anderson

Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Rachel Silverman

Abstract

Most people are unaware of where their food comes from and/or how it is produced. Mass production of commodity crops has severely altered not only the quality of the food we consume, but also the way we think about food. Fortunately, the demand for organic and locally grown/raised food sources is on the rise; unfortunately, the cost of healthy and unhealthy food is rising as well. Many people do not consider the possibility of growing their own produce, particularly in urban communities. Additionally, major grocery chains have flooded the country and have forced many farmers to capitulate in order to make ends meet.

Change in our food culture occurs by purchasing from local farmers markets, co-ops, and CSAs. Furthermore, establishing a home garden not only saves money, but also provides the certainty of quality of quality food. Although the idea may seem impractical to many people, a home garden can be established with minimal room and minimal land through a hydroponic method; the vertical potting structure facilitates the practicality of home gardening.

John Joslin, owner and operator of the Common Ground Community Sustained Agriculture (CSA) Farm in DeLand, appeared as a guest speaker in the Environmental Communication (COM 350) class, by which he presented the philosophy and methodology of hydroponic farming. A group of students have put theory to practice by volunteering to work at John’s farm.

The students began with a tour of the farm, provided by John. Over the following weeks, students spent several hours were spent contributing to the farm’s operations and tasting its locally grown, organic produce. Ultimately, a newfound appreciation for food and farming was the result. Discovering the many farms, farmers markets, co-ops, and CSAs throughout Central Florida compels students to buy local, thereby supporting the local economy, as opposed to a distant one.

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Hydroponics at the Common Ground CSA

Most people are unaware of where their food comes from and/or how it is produced. Mass production of commodity crops has severely altered not only the quality of the food we consume, but also the way we think about food. Fortunately, the demand for organic and locally grown/raised food sources is on the rise; unfortunately, the cost of healthy and unhealthy food is rising as well. Many people do not consider the possibility of growing their own produce, particularly in urban communities. Additionally, major grocery chains have flooded the country and have forced many farmers to capitulate in order to make ends meet.

Change in our food culture occurs by purchasing from local farmers markets, co-ops, and CSAs. Furthermore, establishing a home garden not only saves money, but also provides the certainty of quality of quality food. Although the idea may seem impractical to many people, a home garden can be established with minimal room and minimal land through a hydroponic method; the vertical potting structure facilitates the practicality of home gardening.

John Joslin, owner and operator of the Common Ground Community Sustained Agriculture (CSA) Farm in DeLand, appeared as a guest speaker in the Environmental Communication (COM 350) class, by which he presented the philosophy and methodology of hydroponic farming. A group of students have put theory to practice by volunteering to work at John’s farm.

The students began with a tour of the farm, provided by John. Over the following weeks, students spent several hours were spent contributing to the farm’s operations and tasting its locally grown, organic produce. Ultimately, a newfound appreciation for food and farming was the result. Discovering the many farms, farmers markets, co-ops, and CSAs throughout Central Florida compels students to buy local, thereby supporting the local economy, as opposed to a distant one.