group

Authors' Class Standing

Kate Williams: Senior Nadav Eldar: Sophomore Aaron Zuniga: Junior Daniella Rios Romero: Sophomore Christina Kor: Junior Nishigandha Kelkar: Junior

Lead Presenter's Name

Kathryn Williams

Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Sathya Gangadharan

Abstract

This project is part of the NASA Microg-g NExT Challenge and will involve the design and development of an anchoring device for potential use on an asteroid surface. The system’s purpose is to successfully anchor an astronaut to regolith in a microgravity environment, allowing them to take samples and collect data from the asteroid. This design will be tested in the Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) at the Johnson Space Center in June of 2016. The overall design consists of a pneumatic drill and altered auger that will be protected by a collapsible casing. If the anchoring device is effective at keeping the diver secure while mining the asteroid simulants, the experiment will be considered a success.

The design of the device was completed during fall 2015 semester and will be built in the coming months. The device will be tested as it is built by testing it both underwater and against various mixtures of regolith to ensure success at the NBL. By testing the anchoring device NASA can determine the best strategy for safely securing their astronauts to asteroids.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

No

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Anchoring Device for Regolith Design and Development

This project is part of the NASA Microg-g NExT Challenge and will involve the design and development of an anchoring device for potential use on an asteroid surface. The system’s purpose is to successfully anchor an astronaut to regolith in a microgravity environment, allowing them to take samples and collect data from the asteroid. This design will be tested in the Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) at the Johnson Space Center in June of 2016. The overall design consists of a pneumatic drill and altered auger that will be protected by a collapsible casing. If the anchoring device is effective at keeping the diver secure while mining the asteroid simulants, the experiment will be considered a success.

The design of the device was completed during fall 2015 semester and will be built in the coming months. The device will be tested as it is built by testing it both underwater and against various mixtures of regolith to ensure success at the NBL. By testing the anchoring device NASA can determine the best strategy for safely securing their astronauts to asteroids.

 

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