group

Authors' Class Standing

Natalie Hahn, Sophomore Kimberly Ventura, Sophomore Cory White, Freshman Michael Meholic, Freshman

Lead Presenter's Name

Natalie Hahn

Faculty Mentor Name

Joanne Detore

Abstract

While engaged in conversation with anyone, humans judge the speaker not only through what they are saying, but also through nonverbal artifacts. These artifacts have a wide range of what they say about the person. One such nonverbal artifact that is seen commonly for females in today’s culture is makeup. This leads to the question of makeup and how it makes an individual be viewed within the professional work environment. A member of our group was used to demonstrate different levels of makeup applications, from no makeup to a heavy application, and then photographed. These photographs were later used for visual evidence in a survey given to professional S.T.E.M. (Science, Technology Engineering, and Mathematical) companies. Thanks to numerous responses, this question has been evaluated to its full extent on many different faucets, such as both negative and positive characteristics the individual seems to display. These results were then complied and analyzed statistically to fully understand the implications of this artifact on women in the professional work environment.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

No

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An Introductory Analysis to Nonverbal Communication in the Workplace

While engaged in conversation with anyone, humans judge the speaker not only through what they are saying, but also through nonverbal artifacts. These artifacts have a wide range of what they say about the person. One such nonverbal artifact that is seen commonly for females in today’s culture is makeup. This leads to the question of makeup and how it makes an individual be viewed within the professional work environment. A member of our group was used to demonstrate different levels of makeup applications, from no makeup to a heavy application, and then photographed. These photographs were later used for visual evidence in a survey given to professional S.T.E.M. (Science, Technology Engineering, and Mathematical) companies. Thanks to numerous responses, this question has been evaluated to its full extent on many different faucets, such as both negative and positive characteristics the individual seems to display. These results were then complied and analyzed statistically to fully understand the implications of this artifact on women in the professional work environment.

 

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