Author Information

Morgan LopezFollow

individual

Authors' Class Standing

Morgan Lopez, Junior

Lead Presenter's Name

Morgan Lopez

Faculty Mentor Name

David Keck

Abstract

This research project examines the lives of Paul Frederick Jansen and his wife Maria Elizabeth White Jansen who were Presbyterian missionaries at the Culion leprosarium in the Philippines from 1922-1945. The Jansens were instrumental in the development of infrastructure at Culion and nourishing Protestant spiritual life there. Their daily advocacy and devotion for the lepers of Culion improved countless lives on the island. Very little has been written about the Jansens. There are a multitude of primary sources, like letters and mission board reports. These sources reveal the Jansens’ work ethic and opinion of their missionary work. The most integral source has been Quarterly of the American Mission to Lepers, Song after Sorrow: The Jansens of Culion which details the transnational story of their lives. They were just two of the countless missionaries who have followed God’s calling, traveled overseas, and made sacrifices for others. Their lives are worth remembering due to the care, fellowship, and service they offered to the lepers of Culion. Their work is not much different than that of Father Damien and Mother Teresa. There lives are remarkable, considering the time period in which they traversed to the Philippines. Here is a remarkable set of people and barely anyone has heard of their work. Why is this? They gave up all of their modern conveniences and traveled to a far off island where leprosy was rampant. To answer why the Jansens are worth remembering, first I must detail what makes a life worth remembering. Then analyze what about the Jansens’ lives make them memorable.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

Yes, Spark Grant

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The Presbyterian Missionaries of Culion Leprosarium

This research project examines the lives of Paul Frederick Jansen and his wife Maria Elizabeth White Jansen who were Presbyterian missionaries at the Culion leprosarium in the Philippines from 1922-1945. The Jansens were instrumental in the development of infrastructure at Culion and nourishing Protestant spiritual life there. Their daily advocacy and devotion for the lepers of Culion improved countless lives on the island. Very little has been written about the Jansens. There are a multitude of primary sources, like letters and mission board reports. These sources reveal the Jansens’ work ethic and opinion of their missionary work. The most integral source has been Quarterly of the American Mission to Lepers, Song after Sorrow: The Jansens of Culion which details the transnational story of their lives. They were just two of the countless missionaries who have followed God’s calling, traveled overseas, and made sacrifices for others. Their lives are worth remembering due to the care, fellowship, and service they offered to the lepers of Culion. Their work is not much different than that of Father Damien and Mother Teresa. There lives are remarkable, considering the time period in which they traversed to the Philippines. Here is a remarkable set of people and barely anyone has heard of their work. Why is this? They gave up all of their modern conveniences and traveled to a far off island where leprosy was rampant. To answer why the Jansens are worth remembering, first I must detail what makes a life worth remembering. Then analyze what about the Jansens’ lives make them memorable.

 

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