Abstract Title

Cuban Vintage Car Culture

individual

Authors' Class Standing

Zachary White, Sophomore

Lead Presenter's Name

Zachary White

Faculty Mentor Name

Wesley Lewis

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to investigate the culture surrounding the vintage American cars found in Cuba and how it compares to the car cultures in the U.S.

Through preliminary research, Cubans are continuing to use these cars as means of transportation and a source of income. They have kept the cars maintained by recycling parts from other cars, tractors, and boats, as well as buying new parts from the black market. Once they have been repaired, many owners around major cities use them as taxis.

While in Havana, I could observe many vintage cars and how they were used and treated. Additionally, I interviewed two drivers of vintage cars. One was the owner of a 1953 Plymouth, while the other was a driver of a government owned 1956 Chevrolet Bel Air.

I found that most of the vintage cars around Havana are used as taxis. This is so that the owners can afford to maintain them as well as provide additional income for their families. The owners are required to pay the government about $600 a month to use them as taxis, but if used in Havana, the owners can make about $20-$30 per hour driving tourists.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

Yes, Ignite Grant

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Cuban Vintage Car Culture

The purpose of this research was to investigate the culture surrounding the vintage American cars found in Cuba and how it compares to the car cultures in the U.S.

Through preliminary research, Cubans are continuing to use these cars as means of transportation and a source of income. They have kept the cars maintained by recycling parts from other cars, tractors, and boats, as well as buying new parts from the black market. Once they have been repaired, many owners around major cities use them as taxis.

While in Havana, I could observe many vintage cars and how they were used and treated. Additionally, I interviewed two drivers of vintage cars. One was the owner of a 1953 Plymouth, while the other was a driver of a government owned 1956 Chevrolet Bel Air.

I found that most of the vintage cars around Havana are used as taxis. This is so that the owners can afford to maintain them as well as provide additional income for their families. The owners are required to pay the government about $600 a month to use them as taxis, but if used in Havana, the owners can make about $20-$30 per hour driving tourists.

 

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