Date of Award

Spring 2012

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

Degree Name

Master of Science in Human Factors & Systems

Department

Human Factors and Systems

Committee Chair

Joh French, Ph.D.

First Committee Member

Albert Bouquet, Ph.D.

Second Committee Member

Debra Crews, Ph.D.

Abstract

The relationship between sleep efficiency and elite level athletic performance that has a definitive and individual measure of performance (like golf, track, & swimming) has never been systematically studied. The extreme and rigorous travel schedules of professional golfers prevent consistent and necessary sleep schedules. The Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) permitted Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU) to ask for volunteers at two tournaments during October of 2010 to complete subjective sleep fatigue logs. Analysis of the sleep fatigue logs revealed a relationship between sleep quality and performance (golf score). Subsequent relationships were also found between subjective fatigue and sleep quality, and subjective fatigue and performance. These results could have important implications for athletes and others who require consistently skilled performance in the course of their duties; particularly for those individuals that are subjected to extreme travel schedules, extended work shifts or extreme work environments.

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