Abstract Title

A comparison of Shared Mental Models between Veteran Students and Traditional Students in an academic team setting

Presentation Type

Paper

Abstract

A comparison of Shared Mental Models between Veteran Students and Traditional Students in an academic team setting

Saumalu Mataafa and Kristen Welsh

The creation of the Yellow Ribbon Program and the post 9/11 bills have supported and funded college education for veterans. Consequently the rates at which veterans have entered college has increased. However, the U.S. Census Bureau’s Current Population Survey from 2000-2009 showed that almost half of all male veterans who entered college left without obtaining their Bachelor’s degree. Conversely, female veterans were more likely to enter and complete their Bachelor’s degree than their male counterparts. The Veteran’s Affairs Office advocated that age was a strong contributing factor to degree completion and that the median age of male veterans entering college was 61. The dynamics and characteristics that fuel and make military teams effective in combat for male veterans may stymy a successful transition into academic teams at post-secondary institutions. Interactions between veteran and traditional students may also be a factor in veteran retention.

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU) is a highly advertised post-secondary institution for veterans because of its accessibility through both online and residential campuses. At ERAU’s Daytona Beach campus the veteran population is spread among the many Bachelor degree programs offered. The purpose of this study is to determine the various challenges and differences veterans are facing in academia, specifically in their interactions with traditional students in the classroom setting. Data will be collected from students through the Group Environment Questionnaire (GEQ) and follow up interviews. After data analysis we hope to provide universities with updated tactics for integrating veterans into the main population of students and thus increasing retention rates and degree completion.

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A comparison of Shared Mental Models between Veteran Students and Traditional Students in an academic team setting

A comparison of Shared Mental Models between Veteran Students and Traditional Students in an academic team setting

Saumalu Mataafa and Kristen Welsh

The creation of the Yellow Ribbon Program and the post 9/11 bills have supported and funded college education for veterans. Consequently the rates at which veterans have entered college has increased. However, the U.S. Census Bureau’s Current Population Survey from 2000-2009 showed that almost half of all male veterans who entered college left without obtaining their Bachelor’s degree. Conversely, female veterans were more likely to enter and complete their Bachelor’s degree than their male counterparts. The Veteran’s Affairs Office advocated that age was a strong contributing factor to degree completion and that the median age of male veterans entering college was 61. The dynamics and characteristics that fuel and make military teams effective in combat for male veterans may stymy a successful transition into academic teams at post-secondary institutions. Interactions between veteran and traditional students may also be a factor in veteran retention.

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU) is a highly advertised post-secondary institution for veterans because of its accessibility through both online and residential campuses. At ERAU’s Daytona Beach campus the veteran population is spread among the many Bachelor degree programs offered. The purpose of this study is to determine the various challenges and differences veterans are facing in academia, specifically in their interactions with traditional students in the classroom setting. Data will be collected from students through the Group Environment Questionnaire (GEQ) and follow up interviews. After data analysis we hope to provide universities with updated tactics for integrating veterans into the main population of students and thus increasing retention rates and degree completion.