Abstract Title

Bridging the Gap between Psychology and Engineering Through the Use of Unified Modeling Language

Presentation Type

Paper

Abstract

Where there have been gaps in communicating between psychologists and engineers, collaborative project goals may not always reach their full potential. The risk for stunted performance in such interdisciplinary projects makes it prudent to examine ways of improving communication and brainstorming methods such that psychologists and engineers can gain the most from their interactions. Tools that have been used to aid this process include scenarios, storyboards, prototypes, and simple modeling (de Paula, Barbosa, & de Lucena, 2004). However, the use of such tools is frequently limited by (1) the psychologist’s ability and willingness to use the tool and (2) how much information the tool conveys relative to what the engineer may need to know.

In addressing these limitations, this presentation suggests that psychologists consider learning a simple modeling language known as unified modeling language (UML) to assist in conveying ideas to engineers. The use of unified modeling language (UML) may allow psychologists to more effectively collaborate with engineers by modeling technical systems in a way that is more in line with how such systems are built. Subsequently, engineers will be able to build systems more accurate to the psychologist’s needs.

Several factors make UML a language a worthwhile tool for psychologists to learn. First, a UML diagram is fairly easy to understand, especially if a legend or key is provided with the diagram. Second, engineers are often familiar with UML and similar modeling languages, so they may already have an affinity for such a tool. Third, UML is easy to learn, making it a desirable tool for professionals of all disciplines. There are many applications and resources that can aid in the development of a UML diagram. Finally, UML encompasses many types of models, which make it possible to convey many different aspects of one system, including human interaction with a system.

The purpose of this presentation is to explore UML as a tool for aiding communication and brainstorming processes between psychologists and engineers. Examples of various UML diagrams and their use will be discussed. It is hoped that this presentation will draw attention to a modeling language that has been heretofore underused in psychology and thus increase its popularity in this field as a tool to aid in communication with engineers.

References:

de Paula, M. G., Barbosa, S. D. J., & de Lucena, C. J. P. (2004, October). Conveying human-computer interaction concerns to software engineers through an interaction model. In VI Workshop on Human Factors in Computer Systems, IHC. (pp. 155-162).

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Bridging the Gap between Psychology and Engineering Through the Use of Unified Modeling Language

Where there have been gaps in communicating between psychologists and engineers, collaborative project goals may not always reach their full potential. The risk for stunted performance in such interdisciplinary projects makes it prudent to examine ways of improving communication and brainstorming methods such that psychologists and engineers can gain the most from their interactions. Tools that have been used to aid this process include scenarios, storyboards, prototypes, and simple modeling (de Paula, Barbosa, & de Lucena, 2004). However, the use of such tools is frequently limited by (1) the psychologist’s ability and willingness to use the tool and (2) how much information the tool conveys relative to what the engineer may need to know.

In addressing these limitations, this presentation suggests that psychologists consider learning a simple modeling language known as unified modeling language (UML) to assist in conveying ideas to engineers. The use of unified modeling language (UML) may allow psychologists to more effectively collaborate with engineers by modeling technical systems in a way that is more in line with how such systems are built. Subsequently, engineers will be able to build systems more accurate to the psychologist’s needs.

Several factors make UML a language a worthwhile tool for psychologists to learn. First, a UML diagram is fairly easy to understand, especially if a legend or key is provided with the diagram. Second, engineers are often familiar with UML and similar modeling languages, so they may already have an affinity for such a tool. Third, UML is easy to learn, making it a desirable tool for professionals of all disciplines. There are many applications and resources that can aid in the development of a UML diagram. Finally, UML encompasses many types of models, which make it possible to convey many different aspects of one system, including human interaction with a system.

The purpose of this presentation is to explore UML as a tool for aiding communication and brainstorming processes between psychologists and engineers. Examples of various UML diagrams and their use will be discussed. It is hoped that this presentation will draw attention to a modeling language that has been heretofore underused in psychology and thus increase its popularity in this field as a tool to aid in communication with engineers.

References:

de Paula, M. G., Barbosa, S. D. J., & de Lucena, C. J. P. (2004, October). Conveying human-computer interaction concerns to software engineers through an interaction model. In VI Workshop on Human Factors in Computer Systems, IHC. (pp. 155-162).