Abstract Title

Comparison of the diagnostic capabilities between CAD, the Dvorine Pseudo-Isochromatic Plates and the Farnsworth-Munsell D-15 test

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Comparison of the diagnostic capabilities between CAD, the Dvorine Pseudo-Isochromatic Plates and the Farnsworth-Munsell D-15 test

Saumalu Mataafa, Brittany Swigert, Lissette Nunez and Jon French, PhD

Color vision deficiency is clinically diagnosed with pass or fail exams. The Dvorine Pseudo-Isochromatic plates, Ishihara Color Vision plates, and the Farnsworth-Munsell Dichotomous D-15 test are commonly used as the primary diagnostic tests for determining color vision deficiencies. These tests are difficult and expensive to administer and frequently unreliable for identifying individuals with mild to moderate color vision deficiencies.

The Colour Assessment and Diagnosis (CAD) test utilizes techniques that isolate color signals and uses red/green and yellow/blue thresholds to determine if a color vision deficiency is present. CAD not only identifies color deficient individuals but also scores their results in terms of severity on a numbered scale. Unlike the pass or fail exams which are clinically administered and identify only two types of color deficiencies, CAD has the capability of accurately diagnosing all types of color vision deficiencies. CAD is often used in the occupational environment as a screening tool and is implemented in aviation, the fire service, the police force, and train operations.

Currently, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) uses CAD as a diagnostic tool for air traffic controllers. The FAA is sponsoring this research to determine how results from the Dvorine Pseudo-Isochromatic plates and Farnsworth-Munsell D15 tests compare to the CAD. Analyses of compiled data suggest that the CAD is a more sensitive color vision diagnostic than its clinical counterparts. CAD greatly reduces errors in classification and provides gradients of deficiency that help distinguish between dichromats.

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Comparison of the diagnostic capabilities between CAD, the Dvorine Pseudo-Isochromatic Plates and the Farnsworth-Munsell D-15 test

Comparison of the diagnostic capabilities between CAD, the Dvorine Pseudo-Isochromatic Plates and the Farnsworth-Munsell D-15 test

Saumalu Mataafa, Brittany Swigert, Lissette Nunez and Jon French, PhD

Color vision deficiency is clinically diagnosed with pass or fail exams. The Dvorine Pseudo-Isochromatic plates, Ishihara Color Vision plates, and the Farnsworth-Munsell Dichotomous D-15 test are commonly used as the primary diagnostic tests for determining color vision deficiencies. These tests are difficult and expensive to administer and frequently unreliable for identifying individuals with mild to moderate color vision deficiencies.

The Colour Assessment and Diagnosis (CAD) test utilizes techniques that isolate color signals and uses red/green and yellow/blue thresholds to determine if a color vision deficiency is present. CAD not only identifies color deficient individuals but also scores their results in terms of severity on a numbered scale. Unlike the pass or fail exams which are clinically administered and identify only two types of color deficiencies, CAD has the capability of accurately diagnosing all types of color vision deficiencies. CAD is often used in the occupational environment as a screening tool and is implemented in aviation, the fire service, the police force, and train operations.

Currently, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) uses CAD as a diagnostic tool for air traffic controllers. The FAA is sponsoring this research to determine how results from the Dvorine Pseudo-Isochromatic plates and Farnsworth-Munsell D15 tests compare to the CAD. Analyses of compiled data suggest that the CAD is a more sensitive color vision diagnostic than its clinical counterparts. CAD greatly reduces errors in classification and provides gradients of deficiency that help distinguish between dichromats.