Abstract Title

Knowledge on Demand: Just-in-Time Training & Performance Support Systems

Presentation Type

Paper

Abstract

Knowledge on demand is the principle underlying just-in-time training and performance support systems. Using these approaches, users learn how to perform a task while they complete it. Such approaches have broad implications for reducing upfront training costs and improving task performance in a variety of fields. In particular, the field of medicine makes use of knowledge on demand systems; the decision support systems (DSS) used by diagnosticians are meant to improve their ability to correctly diagnose difficult cases.

While there is literature supporting the effectiveness of these approaches, there is a lack of research into the appropriate design of systems that are intended to deliver training at the moment of need. We believe that this owes to the variety of methods by which these methods can be achieved. This paper describes the different methods by which user performance can be supported using knowledge on demand principles, such as by implementing just-in-time training or electronic performance support systems. Further, we discuss the gaps in our understanding of how these systems should be designed, and call for future research into these methods and systems, in order to broaden the applicability of knowledge on demand principles.

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Knowledge on Demand: Just-in-Time Training & Performance Support Systems

Knowledge on demand is the principle underlying just-in-time training and performance support systems. Using these approaches, users learn how to perform a task while they complete it. Such approaches have broad implications for reducing upfront training costs and improving task performance in a variety of fields. In particular, the field of medicine makes use of knowledge on demand systems; the decision support systems (DSS) used by diagnosticians are meant to improve their ability to correctly diagnose difficult cases.

While there is literature supporting the effectiveness of these approaches, there is a lack of research into the appropriate design of systems that are intended to deliver training at the moment of need. We believe that this owes to the variety of methods by which these methods can be achieved. This paper describes the different methods by which user performance can be supported using knowledge on demand principles, such as by implementing just-in-time training or electronic performance support systems. Further, we discuss the gaps in our understanding of how these systems should be designed, and call for future research into these methods and systems, in order to broaden the applicability of knowledge on demand principles.