•  
  •  
 

Publisher

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Abstract

Each new generation entering the workforce follows a unique path preparing them for success in their respective industry. A myriad of factors influence this transitional process including advancements in technology, economic and cultural factors as well as characteristics common to each generation. This process of training in technical and professional knowledge is uniquely important in the transition into the airline industry. This pilot study focused on collecting and evaluating the perceptions of management and instructors in a regional airline training environment as they trained new hire pilots from day 1 of Company Indoctrination to completion of Operating Experience (OE). This pilot study was completed to determine validity and reliability of the survey instrument which focused on instructors’ perceptions of technical and professional preparedness. The survey, found to be reliable and valid, was structured primarily using Likert-style questions as well as providing opportunity for qualitative feedback. The data-set included 37 responses to Likert-style survey questions which were grouped into three phases based on chronology of interaction with the new hire. The preliminary data suggests an appropriate improvement is perceived in selected metrics as new hires progress, whereas others should be considered for further enhancement. Communications with air traffic control (ATC) as well as knowledge of emergencies and abnormal procedures are training where additional preparation may be required. The data also shows correlations between certain measured variables, both in professionalism and technical knowledge, which suggests preparations in certain areas may have corresponding improvements or impact in secondary or tertiary performance opportunities.

Share

COinS