Presenter Email

paul.ryder@alpa.org

Location

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

Start Date

15-8-2017 10:15 AM

End Date

15-8-2017 11:45 AM

Submission Type

Presentation

Topic Area

Pilot supply

Keywords

pilot, pilot experience, pilot supply, pilot training

Abstract

A well-trained and highly skilled pilot is the most important safety feature of any airline flight. Since 2010 there have been no passenger fatalities on board an airline aircraft in the United States. This remarkable achievement coincides with FAA rule changes that mandated higher levels of minimum experience for airline pilots.

ALPA continuously monitors the current trends in pilot hiring, pilot license certificate issuances, and pilot supply forecasts. With an eye towards ensuring that airline safety remains the highest priority, the presentation will begin with a review of the current pilot supply data.

An argument is made for valuing high-quality pilot experience using accident reports. The paper will examine studies that claim training duration and washout rates of newly hired pilots is an indicator of the quality of a pilot. Various aspects of experience will be discussed, including key elements. . As many have postulated, the foundational training received during the pilot’s education and flight training is important. However the pilot’s training environment, types of testing, the diversity of airports and weather encountered, mentoring, and even a pilot’s life experiences outside of aviation are all contributors to pilot safety.

Comments

Presented during Session 4 (cont.): Pilot Supply Problem

Presenter Biography

Capt. Paul Ryder

Resource Coordinator, Air Line Pilots Association, Int’l

As the resource coordinator at the Air Line Pilots Association Int’l (ALPA), Capt. Paul Ryder facilitates the full and efficient use of ALPA staff and resources for the pilot leadership. He works closely with all departments and pilot groups in order to best serve ALPA’s members and assist the pilot groups’ Master Executive Council (MEC) leadership and negotiating committees. He also works with ALPA’s Collective Bargaining Committee, other ALPA presidential committees, and MECs to advance the pilots’ agenda and ensure that pilot groups have no issues accessing ALPA resources.

Ryder, an EMB-145 captain for ExpressJet Airlines, also chairs the Association’s Fee-for-Departure (FFD) Committee, working with representatives from all FFD carriers to find innovative and constructive solutions to the issues facing this group.

He continues to serve the ExpressJet MEC on their Pilot Mentor, Strategic Planning, and Communications committees. Previously, he was chair of the ExpressJet MEC’s Pilot-to-Pilot Committee and ALPA’s Education Committee. Captain Ryder recently led a Pilot Supply round-table discussion at the International Federation of Air Line Pilots Associations and for the past two years has participated as a speaker at the annual Royal Aeronautical Society on pilot supply, as well as other speaking engagements. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserves for six years and lives in Florida with his wife and fellow pilot, Kate, and two young sons, Alex and Matthew.

View Paul Ryder’s Bio Page

1072 Ryder.pptx (481 kB)
Original PowerPoint, Full-res

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Aug 15th, 10:15 AM Aug 15th, 11:45 AM

Airline Pilot Supply and Pilot Experience

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

A well-trained and highly skilled pilot is the most important safety feature of any airline flight. Since 2010 there have been no passenger fatalities on board an airline aircraft in the United States. This remarkable achievement coincides with FAA rule changes that mandated higher levels of minimum experience for airline pilots.

ALPA continuously monitors the current trends in pilot hiring, pilot license certificate issuances, and pilot supply forecasts. With an eye towards ensuring that airline safety remains the highest priority, the presentation will begin with a review of the current pilot supply data.

An argument is made for valuing high-quality pilot experience using accident reports. The paper will examine studies that claim training duration and washout rates of newly hired pilots is an indicator of the quality of a pilot. Various aspects of experience will be discussed, including key elements. . As many have postulated, the foundational training received during the pilot’s education and flight training is important. However the pilot’s training environment, types of testing, the diversity of airports and weather encountered, mentoring, and even a pilot’s life experiences outside of aviation are all contributors to pilot safety.

 

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