Presenter Email

mrusekb@erau.edu

Location

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

Start Date

15-8-2017 1:15 PM

End Date

15-8-2017 2:15 PM

Submission Type

Presentation

Topic Area

Leadership/management in aviation organizations

Keywords

Aviation Maintenance, MTS, Shared Leadership

Abstract

The use of a multiteam system approach has been proven useful for many organizational environments, notably those that operate in dynamic and demanding surroundings. These settings also rely on the success of several, independent teams to accomplish an organizational objective. Similarly, the notion of shared leadership, across multiple teams, has been proven to increase the efficiency of organizational output, by distributing the responsibility of leadership laterally. While the combination of these two approaches have been examined in the cockpit and cabin crew environment, its application may prove useful in an aviation maintenance environment as well. A MTS approach involves two or more teams which interact both directly and indirectly in response to environmental constructs, in an effort to accomplish a collective goal (Mathieu, Marks, & Zaccaro, 2001). The different departments which comprise aviation maintenance environments may provide an optimal setting for which to test this application. Similarly, shared leadership supports the overall mission of MTS, by enabling multiple leaders with responsibility laterally, in an effort to accomplish organizational objectives. The use of shared leadership has proven successful in single teams environments, notably when tasks are interdependent and complex (Friedrich et al., 2009), as is often the case in an aviation maintenance department. The application of shared leadership in an MTS aviation maintenance environment, therefore, may contribute to the successful attainment of organizational objectives. Additionally, if communication between the individual departments, or teams, that comprise an aviation maintenance department is improved, the quality of work and safety may increase as well.

References:

Friedrich, T. L., Vessey, W. B., Schuelke, M. J., Ruark, G. A., & Mumford, M. D. (2009). A framework for understanding collective leadership: The selective utilization of leader and team expertise within networks. Leadership Quarterly, 20, 933–958.

Mathieu, J. E., Marks, M. A., & Zaccaro, S. J. (2001). Multi-team systems. International handbook of work and organizational psychology (pp. 289–313). London: Sage.

Comments

Presented during Session 5: Leadership in Aviation

Presenter Biography

Bettina has been working with Embry-Riddle since 2014. She began as a Veteran’s Affairs Counselor for Worldwide and then transitioned to a full-time faculty member in 2016. As an Assistant Professor for the College of Aeronautics, Worldwide campus, Bettina teaches a variety of aviation maintenance classes in addition to serving on the Scholarship and Awards Committee. Bettina is also the Program Chair for the Master of Aviation Maintenance degree program.

Prior to joining ERAU, Bettina served in the United States Marine Corps for 14 years. She worked as an avionics communication/navigation technician and supervisor for multiple aircraft platforms, including rotary and fixed-wing. In addition to her job as a technician, Bettina also worked in operations, supervised the Mobile Maintenance Facility program, and served three years as a Drill Instructor on Parris Island. She has a wide array of knowledge and experience with leadership, safety, preventive maintenance, inspections, and general aviation.

Bettina has a Bachelor of Science in Management from Park University, a Master of Science in Business Administration from Park University, and a PhD in Business Administration specializing in Management from Northcentral University.

Bettina currently resides in New Smyrna Beach, Florida. She enjoys outdoor activities including hiking, swimming, and running. She is married to an active duty Marine and they have one son.

View Bettina Mrusek’s Bio Page

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Aug 15th, 1:15 PM Aug 15th, 2:15 PM

The Application of Shared Leadership in an Aviation Maintenance MTS Environment

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

The use of a multiteam system approach has been proven useful for many organizational environments, notably those that operate in dynamic and demanding surroundings. These settings also rely on the success of several, independent teams to accomplish an organizational objective. Similarly, the notion of shared leadership, across multiple teams, has been proven to increase the efficiency of organizational output, by distributing the responsibility of leadership laterally. While the combination of these two approaches have been examined in the cockpit and cabin crew environment, its application may prove useful in an aviation maintenance environment as well. A MTS approach involves two or more teams which interact both directly and indirectly in response to environmental constructs, in an effort to accomplish a collective goal (Mathieu, Marks, & Zaccaro, 2001). The different departments which comprise aviation maintenance environments may provide an optimal setting for which to test this application. Similarly, shared leadership supports the overall mission of MTS, by enabling multiple leaders with responsibility laterally, in an effort to accomplish organizational objectives. The use of shared leadership has proven successful in single teams environments, notably when tasks are interdependent and complex (Friedrich et al., 2009), as is often the case in an aviation maintenance department. The application of shared leadership in an MTS aviation maintenance environment, therefore, may contribute to the successful attainment of organizational objectives. Additionally, if communication between the individual departments, or teams, that comprise an aviation maintenance department is improved, the quality of work and safety may increase as well.

References:

Friedrich, T. L., Vessey, W. B., Schuelke, M. J., Ruark, G. A., & Mumford, M. D. (2009). A framework for understanding collective leadership: The selective utilization of leader and team expertise within networks. Leadership Quarterly, 20, 933–958.

Mathieu, J. E., Marks, M. A., & Zaccaro, S. J. (2001). Multi-team systems. International handbook of work and organizational psychology (pp. 289–313). London: Sage.

 

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