Title

Pilot Control Design Influences on Pilot Monitoring Effectiveness of Crew Resource Management in Airbus 320 Landings

Presenter Information

Edwin OdishoFollow

Location

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

Start Date

14-8-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

14-8-2017 10:15 AM

Submission Type

Abstract - Paper/Presentation Only

Topic Area

Human factors

Keywords

CRM, PM effectiveness, FAA AC 120-71B, Airbus 320 landings

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of Airbus flight control design on pilot perception of Crew Resource Management (CRM) in the landing phase of flight. Federal Aviation Administration Advisory Circular 120-71B: Standard Operating Procedures and Pilot Monitoring Duties for Flight Deck Crewmembers, published in January 2017, defines Pilot Monitoring (PM) responsibilities and potential barriers to PM effectiveness of these duties. The unique flight deck design of the A320 includes non-coupled, independently manipulated, side stick controllers, and non-moving autothrust levers. The combination of these design elements on the A320 flight deck presents unique challenges to the flight crew, particularly in the landing phase of flight. Because the Pilot Monitoring (PM) receives no visual or tactile feedback of Pilot Flying (PF) flight control inputs, his/her traditional PM duties could be less effective. An observational field study and survey is proposed to be conducted with A320 line pilot participants. The practical implications of the field study will be to increase understanding of the effects of A320 pilot flight control design on pilot perception of PM effectiveness in the landing phase of flight. It is anticipated that human factors researchers, design engineers, operators, and airline training departments will benefit from the research.

Comments

Presented during Session 1: Advances in Flight Training

Presenter Biography

I received a Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Texas in 1986. I was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps after completing the Platoon Leader’s Class, Officer Candidate School in Quantico, VA in December, 1986. I was awarded my Naval Aviator Wings of Gold in 1989 at NAS Corpus Christi, TX, where I was a distinguished graduate. I flew KC-130’s in VMGR-152 based at MCAS Futenma, Okinawa from 1990 to 1993. I then served as an instructor pilot in VMGRT-253 on KC-130F models. I graduated from the USAF Test Pilot School, Edwards AFB, in 1995 with Class 94B and was the winner of the Onizuka Leadership Award. I then served as a test pilot and project officer at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, MD until I left active duty in 1998. While at Pax River, I graduated with a Master of Science in Aviation Science from the University of Tennessee in 1996. Following my time in the Marine Corps, I became an airline pilot with American Airlines in 1998 and was fortunate to be based near my home at our Miami base. I have flown the Boeing 727, 757, 767, 777, and the A320 family of aircraft. I am currently a Check Airman Captain on the A320. My duties include instructing/evaluating initial and transitioning pilots to line flying on the A320. I have had several safety related collateral duties at American Airlines. I have served on both the Miami Base and National Allied Pilots Association Safety Committees. As a member of our safety team, I have participated as a Line Operations Safety Audit (LOSA) observer and contributed to our Aviation Safety Action Program (ASAP). I am a Doctoral Student at Embry-Riddle University College of Aviation.

It has been during my experiences while instructing on the A320 that I became intrigued by the flight control designs unique to the A320. My research interests are associated with the effects of flight deck design, automation, and aeronautical decision making on Crew Resource Management, particularly Pilot Monitoring responsibilities and barriers. I am specifically interested in issues in Pilot Monitoring in side-stick controller design, particularly with the comparison of passive, versus active, side-stick design.

My wife, Bettina, and I have two daughters, Natalie, 25, and Sofia, 13. We live in Weston, FL. My hobbies include the gym, cycling, photography, hiking, and reading.

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Aug 14th, 9:00 AM Aug 14th, 10:15 AM

Pilot Control Design Influences on Pilot Monitoring Effectiveness of Crew Resource Management in Airbus 320 Landings

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of Airbus flight control design on pilot perception of Crew Resource Management (CRM) in the landing phase of flight. Federal Aviation Administration Advisory Circular 120-71B: Standard Operating Procedures and Pilot Monitoring Duties for Flight Deck Crewmembers, published in January 2017, defines Pilot Monitoring (PM) responsibilities and potential barriers to PM effectiveness of these duties. The unique flight deck design of the A320 includes non-coupled, independently manipulated, side stick controllers, and non-moving autothrust levers. The combination of these design elements on the A320 flight deck presents unique challenges to the flight crew, particularly in the landing phase of flight. Because the Pilot Monitoring (PM) receives no visual or tactile feedback of Pilot Flying (PF) flight control inputs, his/her traditional PM duties could be less effective. An observational field study and survey is proposed to be conducted with A320 line pilot participants. The practical implications of the field study will be to increase understanding of the effects of A320 pilot flight control design on pilot perception of PM effectiveness in the landing phase of flight. It is anticipated that human factors researchers, design engineers, operators, and airline training departments will benefit from the research.