Presenter Email

bill@tuccio.com

Location

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

Start Date

16-8-2017 8:15 AM

End Date

16-8-2017 9:45 AM

Submission Type

Presentation

Topic Area

Improving instructor pilot teaching quality

Keywords

CARM, Conversation Analysis, Role Play

Abstract

The audience will learn about Stokoe’s Conversation Analytic Role-play Method (CARM) (http://www.carmtraining.org) and how it has been used to study and improve talk-in-interaction in professional settings. CARM is a proven, research-based methodology which collects large volumes of recorded audio and/or video particular to a professional setting and then uses detailed transcription and conversation analysis to identify systematic patterns of interaction and problems thereof. Actual excerpts from the dataset are appropriately anonymized and used by facilitators in a workshop setting to create authentic role-play.

The presentation will explain how CARM has been applied to help improve flight instructor teaching quality (see JAAER, 2017, 26 (1), Tuccio & Nevile). This research includes the collection and coding of over 100 hours of flight instruction video and audio by consenting pilots, and the subsequent identification of “trainable” interactional moments useful to current and prospective flight instructors.

The audience will interactively participate in exemplary CARM training as it has been used at FAA Safety Team seminars.

A small excerpt from one trainable follows. At line 21, a check instructor on an instrument stage check asks the student if they will get “positive sensing.” The long pause, throat clearing, and prosody of lines 22-24 make salient a misunderstanding. Through workshop role-play and discussion, instructors can identify the problem and decide how they may avoid a similar pitfall.

21 *INS: no:w are we gonna get (.) positive sensing, (.) on the CDI?
22 (1.1)
23 *STU: ((clears throat))
24 *STU: positive sensing?
25 (0.5)
26 *INS: yeah.

Presenter Biography

William Tuccio - ATP/CFI, Independent Researcher

William (“Bill”) Tuccio was a regional airline pilot and has diverse experience in engineering, aviation, flight instruction, software engineering, accident investigation, and conversation analysis (CA). In 2010 he joined the first cohort of Embry-Riddle’s PhD in Aviation program, earning his doctorate with a dissertation studying linguistics applied to pilot training. He currently is a part-time flight instructor and an investigator for the National Transportation Safety Board, working with recovery of electronics, including aviation cockpit voice recorders, and audio and video from aviation and rail. He has published numerous technical reports in support of accident investigations. His PhD in Aviation dissertation explored interventionist conversation analysis for pilot training.

After completing his dissertation, he co-authored a paper with his dissertation committee published in the Pragmatics of Professional Discourse issue of Pragmatics and Society(2016), “Interventionist Applied Conversation Analysis: Collaborative Transcription and Repair Based Learning (CTRBL) in Aviation.” Continuing his interest in CA, he attended Elizabeth Stokoe’s Conversation Analytic Role-play Method (CARM) affiliate workshop at Loughborough University, England and then teamed up with Dr. Maurice Nevile to investigate using CARM to improve flight instructor effectiveness based upon voluntarily submitted video and audio recordings. Bill continues to independently pursue CA education through attendance at workshops. As a CARM affiliate, flight instructor, and FAASTeam Representative, Bill has delivered interactive CARM seminars to flight instructors.

Dr. Tuccio received his Bachelor of Science degree in Aeronautical Engineering from Rensselaer and his Master of Aviation Science degree from Embry-Riddle. Additional relevant publications include International Journal of Applied Aviation Studies (2011), Journal of Aviation Technology and Engineering (2012), Journal of Navigation (2012), Language and Social Interaction Working Group Annual Conference (2016), and Journal of Aviation/Aerospace Education & Research (2011, 2017).

View William Tuccio’s Bio Page

 
Aug 16th, 8:15 AM Aug 16th, 9:45 AM

Improving Instructor Quality using the Conversation Analytic Role-play Method (CARM)

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

The audience will learn about Stokoe’s Conversation Analytic Role-play Method (CARM) (http://www.carmtraining.org) and how it has been used to study and improve talk-in-interaction in professional settings. CARM is a proven, research-based methodology which collects large volumes of recorded audio and/or video particular to a professional setting and then uses detailed transcription and conversation analysis to identify systematic patterns of interaction and problems thereof. Actual excerpts from the dataset are appropriately anonymized and used by facilitators in a workshop setting to create authentic role-play.

The presentation will explain how CARM has been applied to help improve flight instructor teaching quality (see JAAER, 2017, 26 (1), Tuccio & Nevile). This research includes the collection and coding of over 100 hours of flight instruction video and audio by consenting pilots, and the subsequent identification of “trainable” interactional moments useful to current and prospective flight instructors.

The audience will interactively participate in exemplary CARM training as it has been used at FAA Safety Team seminars.

A small excerpt from one trainable follows. At line 21, a check instructor on an instrument stage check asks the student if they will get “positive sensing.” The long pause, throat clearing, and prosody of lines 22-24 make salient a misunderstanding. Through workshop role-play and discussion, instructors can identify the problem and decide how they may avoid a similar pitfall.

21 *INS: no:w are we gonna get (.) positive sensing, (.) on the CDI?
22 (1.1)
23 *STU: ((clears throat))
24 *STU: positive sensing?
25 (0.5)
26 *INS: yeah.

 

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