Presenter Email

kingj14@my.erau.edu

Location

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

Start Date

16-8-2017 8:15 AM

End Date

16-8-2017 9:45 AM

Submission Type

Presentation

Topic Area

Other – please specify below

Other Topic Area

Aviation Weather

Keywords

Weather, General Aviation, Flight Safety

Abstract

Introduction: Over the past 30 years, General Aviation (GA) operations have incurred the majority of weather related accidents in civil aviation operations. Aviation weather knowledge and skills are imperative for hazardous weather avoidance and safe flight activity. Previous research suggests applying human-computer interaction (HCI) principles to weather products may promote better decision-making among pilots. Currently, the Aviation Weather Center (AWC) generates two forms of graphical weather products for reporting icing, turbulence, and visibility: traditional human-in-the-loop products (G-AIRMETs Ice, Tango, and Sierra) and the fully-automated products (CIP/FIP, GTG, and CVA). This study compares pilots’ interpretation of fully-automated products against their interpretation of human-in-loop products.

Method: Participants (n=131) completed a series of weather product interpretation questions. Mixed ANOVAs were conducted to analyze the effects of pilot certificate and/or rating (Student, Private, Private w/Instrument, Commercial w/ Instrument) and product generation (traditional vs. automated) on product interpretation scores.

Results: Regardless of product generation, pilots displayed similar levels of proficiency when interpreting the icing and ceiling/visibility products. However, pilots’ performed significantly better on the new fully automated turbulence product (GTG) than on the traditional human-in-the-loop turbulence product (AIRMET Tango).

Discussion: Producing more user-friendly weather products may make weather product interpretation easier for novice pilots.

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Aug 16th, 8:15 AM Aug 16th, 9:45 AM

Evaluating GA Pilots' Interpretation of New Automated Weather Products

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

Introduction: Over the past 30 years, General Aviation (GA) operations have incurred the majority of weather related accidents in civil aviation operations. Aviation weather knowledge and skills are imperative for hazardous weather avoidance and safe flight activity. Previous research suggests applying human-computer interaction (HCI) principles to weather products may promote better decision-making among pilots. Currently, the Aviation Weather Center (AWC) generates two forms of graphical weather products for reporting icing, turbulence, and visibility: traditional human-in-the-loop products (G-AIRMETs Ice, Tango, and Sierra) and the fully-automated products (CIP/FIP, GTG, and CVA). This study compares pilots’ interpretation of fully-automated products against their interpretation of human-in-loop products.

Method: Participants (n=131) completed a series of weather product interpretation questions. Mixed ANOVAs were conducted to analyze the effects of pilot certificate and/or rating (Student, Private, Private w/Instrument, Commercial w/ Instrument) and product generation (traditional vs. automated) on product interpretation scores.

Results: Regardless of product generation, pilots displayed similar levels of proficiency when interpreting the icing and ceiling/visibility products. However, pilots’ performed significantly better on the new fully automated turbulence product (GTG) than on the traditional human-in-the-loop turbulence product (AIRMET Tango).

Discussion: Producing more user-friendly weather products may make weather product interpretation easier for novice pilots.

 

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