Presenter Email

techaut@my.erau.edu

Location

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

Start Date

14-8-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

14-8-2017 10:15 AM

Submission Type

Presentation

Topic Area

Human factors

Keywords

EFB, Technology Adoption, Flight Bag

Abstract

Why do some pilots choose to use electronic flight bags (EFBs) in their flight operations, yet others continue to rely on traditional avionics and paper charts? Does the use of EFBs differ by age, gender, or flight experience?

EFBs, now a common tool in aviation, can display navigational charts, weather, and traffic information, and automate calculation of critical fuel and aircraft performance data. Research that uses EFBs as interactive nodes to exchange data with the System-Wide Information Management (SWIM) network is underway. Understanding what factors may explain differences in pilot adoption and use of EFB technology could shape regulations governing EFB development and design, and could influence how EFBs are integrated into flight operations. Insights into whether EFB adoption differs by demographic factors like age, gender, or flight experience could illuminate whether some adoption factors are more important to different groups of pilots. Such knowledge could impact development of training strategies that address diverse pilot views on EFB use, or inform product sales and marketing strategies.

An overview of an ongoing research project using leading theories of technology acceptance will be presented, with a focus on how technology acceptance research could contribute to our understanding of EFB usage trends. Factors to be considered include pilot expectations of the utility of EFBs, how difficult they are to use, available support, social influences, price value, habit, and the pleasure derived from using EFBs.

Comments

Presented during Session 1: Advances in Flight Training

Abstract is formatted to support a Presentation at NTAS 2017.

Work is based on an ongoing doctoral dissertation, and the intent is to provide useful observations related to how technology adoption research can provide insights into how technology is managed and integrated into operations. In this case, the focus is on electronic flight bags (EFB), and utilizes the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT2), which focuses on technology adoption in a consumer context where such adoption is voluntary. However if the completed research supports the use of established technology acceptance models in the aviation context, the research could then be extended to other voluntary use technologies such as angle of attack indicators.

1096 Techau - Final 08.29.17.pptx (1267 kB)
Original PowerPoint, Full-res

Share

COinS
 
Aug 14th, 9:00 AM Aug 14th, 10:15 AM

What Factors Affect General Aviation Pilot Adoption of Electronic Flight Bags?

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

Why do some pilots choose to use electronic flight bags (EFBs) in their flight operations, yet others continue to rely on traditional avionics and paper charts? Does the use of EFBs differ by age, gender, or flight experience?

EFBs, now a common tool in aviation, can display navigational charts, weather, and traffic information, and automate calculation of critical fuel and aircraft performance data. Research that uses EFBs as interactive nodes to exchange data with the System-Wide Information Management (SWIM) network is underway. Understanding what factors may explain differences in pilot adoption and use of EFB technology could shape regulations governing EFB development and design, and could influence how EFBs are integrated into flight operations. Insights into whether EFB adoption differs by demographic factors like age, gender, or flight experience could illuminate whether some adoption factors are more important to different groups of pilots. Such knowledge could impact development of training strategies that address diverse pilot views on EFB use, or inform product sales and marketing strategies.

An overview of an ongoing research project using leading theories of technology acceptance will be presented, with a focus on how technology acceptance research could contribute to our understanding of EFB usage trends. Factors to be considered include pilot expectations of the utility of EFBs, how difficult they are to use, available support, social influences, price value, habit, and the pleasure derived from using EFBs.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.