Title

Multicultural Cockpit Communication - Threat or Opportunity?

Location

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

Start Date

14-8-2017 1:15 PM

End Date

14-8-2017 2:45 PM

Submission Type

Abstract - Paper/Presentation Only

Topic Area

Pilot supply

Other Topic Area

Safety in Aviation; Human Factors; Flight Training

Keywords

Intercultural Communication, Cockpit Team Work; Strategic Pilot Sourcing

Abstract

The proposed paper will detail the ongoing research project around cockpit staffing in today’s airline industry.

While in many European countries cockpit staffing along the lines of cultural compatibility is being practiced, Asian as well as Gulf Airlines have resorted to pairing pilots from different cultural background. The here introduced research investigates the significance of a common cultural context among cockpit crew in order to ascertain successful interaction and effective communication important for daily - but critical in irregular situations. Hiring culturally diverse pilots is increasingly being practiced at many airlines worldwide while heterogeneous company policy is still being maintained at many of the former legacy carriers.

The research sample pool consists of three types of pilots: Those from the former German national carrier, those working for a gulf carrier and those formerly employed in Germany who have moved to the gulf. The findings will help to understand how culture hinders or impedes successful cockpit interactions. While initially comparing and contrasting homogenous and heterogeneous cockpits, the research will allow for inferences and conclusions on either company policy and identify implications for future staffing parameters with regards to cultural compatibility and safety. The research investigates which business strategy leads to the greatest safety in aviation. Additionally the research evaluates which cultures are compatible and thus make good teams in the cockpits and which better not be paired together. The investigation will also allow for conclusions on pilot selection and training process and identifies whether training methods need to be modified to accommodate cultural differences and incompatibilities.

Research Support comes from: Prof. Dr. Ian McAndrew, Professor at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University College of Aeronautics and Chair of the Department of Aeronautics Graduate Studies. Additional support and endorsement comes from the German Airline Pilots Union, Vereinigung Cockpit.

Presenter Biography

Astrid Zajdband, PhD, MA, MSc, BSc, is Adjunct Assistant Professor at Embry-Riddle College of Business where she teaches Multicultural Management and Financial Management. For 25 years she worked for Lufthansa German Airlines in a wide range of operational and administrative functions. She holds degrees in Management, Finance and History.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Aug 14th, 1:15 PM Aug 14th, 2:45 PM

Multicultural Cockpit Communication - Threat or Opportunity?

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

The proposed paper will detail the ongoing research project around cockpit staffing in today’s airline industry.

While in many European countries cockpit staffing along the lines of cultural compatibility is being practiced, Asian as well as Gulf Airlines have resorted to pairing pilots from different cultural background. The here introduced research investigates the significance of a common cultural context among cockpit crew in order to ascertain successful interaction and effective communication important for daily - but critical in irregular situations. Hiring culturally diverse pilots is increasingly being practiced at many airlines worldwide while heterogeneous company policy is still being maintained at many of the former legacy carriers.

The research sample pool consists of three types of pilots: Those from the former German national carrier, those working for a gulf carrier and those formerly employed in Germany who have moved to the gulf. The findings will help to understand how culture hinders or impedes successful cockpit interactions. While initially comparing and contrasting homogenous and heterogeneous cockpits, the research will allow for inferences and conclusions on either company policy and identify implications for future staffing parameters with regards to cultural compatibility and safety. The research investigates which business strategy leads to the greatest safety in aviation. Additionally the research evaluates which cultures are compatible and thus make good teams in the cockpits and which better not be paired together. The investigation will also allow for conclusions on pilot selection and training process and identifies whether training methods need to be modified to accommodate cultural differences and incompatibilities.

Research Support comes from: Prof. Dr. Ian McAndrew, Professor at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University College of Aeronautics and Chair of the Department of Aeronautics Graduate Studies. Additional support and endorsement comes from the German Airline Pilots Union, Vereinigung Cockpit.