Title

Combining Forces: Utilizing Expertise from Applied Linguistics and Flight Instruction for Better ATC Communications

Location

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

Start Date

14-8-2017 1:15 PM

End Date

14-8-2017 2:45 PM

Submission Type

Paper

Topic Area

Flight training

Keywords

ATC Communication, Radiotelephony, Phraseology, Aviation English

Abstract

ATC communications are a complex mix of FAA phraseology and plain English. The dynamic demands of a pilot’s workload, simultaneously operating the aircraft, managing checklists, and maintaining situational awareness, make this domain of communication particularly challenging for many non-native English speakers. The dramatic growth of aviation in regions of the world in which English is not the native language has increased the need for flight training organizations to address and manage language issues. This paper outlines a new initiative at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University to support flight students with the English language necessary for successful flight training. Two subject matter experts (SMEs) - a Certified Flight Instructor (CFI) and an Aviation English Instructor - collaborated to create a course which helps flight students learn the basic foundations of ATC communications for VFR flight, focusing on listening comprehension and speaking strategies. By introducing best practices from language teaching, the operational content is taught to students in a more interactive and communicative manner. Primarily, Task-Based Language Teaching (TBLT), an approach which simulates real-world activities in the classroom by asking students to do meaningful tasks using authentic language, is used to practice ATIS comprehension and radio communications during Ground, Departure, Practice Area, and Arrival Operations. Students are presented with ample opportunity to simulate radio communication in a stress-free environment, strengthening their confidence in their own ability to utilize these exact language skills in their actual flight training. This paper will discuss the design and implementation of this course, including background information, pedagogical rational, instructional methodologies, classroom activities, and proven effectiveness.

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Aug 14th, 1:15 PM Aug 14th, 2:45 PM

Combining Forces: Utilizing Expertise from Applied Linguistics and Flight Instruction for Better ATC Communications

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

ATC communications are a complex mix of FAA phraseology and plain English. The dynamic demands of a pilot’s workload, simultaneously operating the aircraft, managing checklists, and maintaining situational awareness, make this domain of communication particularly challenging for many non-native English speakers. The dramatic growth of aviation in regions of the world in which English is not the native language has increased the need for flight training organizations to address and manage language issues. This paper outlines a new initiative at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University to support flight students with the English language necessary for successful flight training. Two subject matter experts (SMEs) - a Certified Flight Instructor (CFI) and an Aviation English Instructor - collaborated to create a course which helps flight students learn the basic foundations of ATC communications for VFR flight, focusing on listening comprehension and speaking strategies. By introducing best practices from language teaching, the operational content is taught to students in a more interactive and communicative manner. Primarily, Task-Based Language Teaching (TBLT), an approach which simulates real-world activities in the classroom by asking students to do meaningful tasks using authentic language, is used to practice ATIS comprehension and radio communications during Ground, Departure, Practice Area, and Arrival Operations. Students are presented with ample opportunity to simulate radio communication in a stress-free environment, strengthening their confidence in their own ability to utilize these exact language skills in their actual flight training. This paper will discuss the design and implementation of this course, including background information, pedagogical rational, instructional methodologies, classroom activities, and proven effectiveness.