Abstract Title

LIGO-Virgo-SWIFT Collaboration on the Emission of Gravitational Waves from Supernovas

Faculty Mentor Name

Michele Zanolin

Format Preference

Oral Presentation

Abstract

The Core-Collapse supernovae (CCSNe) mark the explosive end of the lives of massive stars. The mysterious mechanism behind CCSNe explosions could be explained by detecting the corresponding gravitational wave (GW) emissions by the laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory, LIGO. GWs are extremely hard to detect because they are weak signals in a floor of instrument noise. Optical observations of CCSNe are already used in coincidence with LIGO data. Using the SWIFT satellite, there can be a monitoring of galaxies using the X-ray probe by observing X-ray transients in coincidence with optical CCSNe. And so, even if a supernova had its light absorbed with dust, X-ray transients that are more penetrating, and thus could be used as a hint on where to search for GWs. The main goal of this research will be to quantify the benefits for LIGO by using the SWIFT satellite to monitor galaxies within 20 Mega parsecs from Earth.

The project will consist of two phases: a training phase where global knowledge of the properties of CCSNe would be achieved, as well as a research phase where the survey database and literature will be used to conduct independent evaluation and estimations of how many CCSNe could be detected by SWIFT by looking for X-ray flashes. The result will be used at a LIGO-Virgo-SWIFT conference that will be based in Italy in June to produce a memorandum of understanding between the two collaborations.

Oral and Poster Presentation

Ignite Grant Award

Location

AC1-114

Start Date

4-10-2015 12:00 PM

End Date

4-10-2015 12:15 PM

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Apr 10th, 12:00 PM Apr 10th, 12:15 PM

LIGO-Virgo-SWIFT Collaboration on the Emission of Gravitational Waves from Supernovas

AC1-114

The Core-Collapse supernovae (CCSNe) mark the explosive end of the lives of massive stars. The mysterious mechanism behind CCSNe explosions could be explained by detecting the corresponding gravitational wave (GW) emissions by the laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory, LIGO. GWs are extremely hard to detect because they are weak signals in a floor of instrument noise. Optical observations of CCSNe are already used in coincidence with LIGO data. Using the SWIFT satellite, there can be a monitoring of galaxies using the X-ray probe by observing X-ray transients in coincidence with optical CCSNe. And so, even if a supernova had its light absorbed with dust, X-ray transients that are more penetrating, and thus could be used as a hint on where to search for GWs. The main goal of this research will be to quantify the benefits for LIGO by using the SWIFT satellite to monitor galaxies within 20 Mega parsecs from Earth.

The project will consist of two phases: a training phase where global knowledge of the properties of CCSNe would be achieved, as well as a research phase where the survey database and literature will be used to conduct independent evaluation and estimations of how many CCSNe could be detected by SWIFT by looking for X-ray flashes. The result will be used at a LIGO-Virgo-SWIFT conference that will be based in Italy in June to produce a memorandum of understanding between the two collaborations.

Oral and Poster Presentation

Ignite Grant Award