Abstract Title

The Effects of Upper Surface Modifications on Low Reynolds's Flight

Faculty Mentor Name

Lance Traub

Format Preference

Oral Presentation

Abstract

The research conducted was focused on manipulating the upper surface boundary layer over an airfoil through controlling transition. This control would prove beneficial for low Reynold’s flight by reducing the pressure drag on airfoil, which could significantly improve the efficiency of small unmanned aerial vehicles. The models used in testing contained two different types of upper surface modifications. The first set was based around a series of circular extrusions, the circles were varied by size, depth, and spacing. The second set of models were based on a triangular ramp similar to that of a NACA inlet, the ramps were varied by size, depth, and spacing. The results of testing thus far has shown that the model with the deepest circular extrusion experiences a shift in its zero angle of attack while the model with the greatest distance between circles illustrated an early reattachment of the separated flow. Testing of the NACA inlets is still under way, although some preliminary results show that certain models have their lowest drag at a point where positive lift is being generated.

Ignite Grant Award

Location

AC1-118

Start Date

4-10-2015 12:00 PM

End Date

4-10-2015 12:15 PM

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Apr 10th, 12:00 PM Apr 10th, 12:15 PM

The Effects of Upper Surface Modifications on Low Reynolds's Flight

AC1-118

The research conducted was focused on manipulating the upper surface boundary layer over an airfoil through controlling transition. This control would prove beneficial for low Reynold’s flight by reducing the pressure drag on airfoil, which could significantly improve the efficiency of small unmanned aerial vehicles. The models used in testing contained two different types of upper surface modifications. The first set was based around a series of circular extrusions, the circles were varied by size, depth, and spacing. The second set of models were based on a triangular ramp similar to that of a NACA inlet, the ramps were varied by size, depth, and spacing. The results of testing thus far has shown that the model with the deepest circular extrusion experiences a shift in its zero angle of attack while the model with the greatest distance between circles illustrated an early reattachment of the separated flow. Testing of the NACA inlets is still under way, although some preliminary results show that certain models have their lowest drag at a point where positive lift is being generated.

Ignite Grant Award