Abstract Title

Analysis of Winglets for Low Reynolds UAV Flight Regimes

Faculty Mentor Name

Shigeo Hayashibara

Format Preference

Oral Presentation

Abstract

The purpose of this research is to analyze winglets on unmanned aerial vehicles in low Reynolds flight regimes for maximum endurance using computational fluid dynamics. In this study, a baseline UAV design was analyzed in STARCCM+ and verified using wind tunnel testing. The CFD model was then fitted with three different winglets and run in the same flight conditions. All cases will be run at a Reynolds number of 300,000 at different angles of attack in order to study improved drag characteristics during a typical flight. Drag polars from each configuration will be generated by STAR-CCM+ and compared to determine the best design for maximum endurance. Post-processing will be performed using FieldView 14 to explain the differences found in the drag polars. The results will demonstrate optimum winglet design for low Reynold’s number flight regimes and show the utility of using computational fluid dynamics for such a study.

Arizona Space Grant Award

Location

AC1-118

Start Date

4-10-2015 12:15 PM

End Date

4-10-2015 12:30 PM

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Apr 10th, 12:15 PM Apr 10th, 12:30 PM

Analysis of Winglets for Low Reynolds UAV Flight Regimes

AC1-118

The purpose of this research is to analyze winglets on unmanned aerial vehicles in low Reynolds flight regimes for maximum endurance using computational fluid dynamics. In this study, a baseline UAV design was analyzed in STARCCM+ and verified using wind tunnel testing. The CFD model was then fitted with three different winglets and run in the same flight conditions. All cases will be run at a Reynolds number of 300,000 at different angles of attack in order to study improved drag characteristics during a typical flight. Drag polars from each configuration will be generated by STAR-CCM+ and compared to determine the best design for maximum endurance. Post-processing will be performed using FieldView 14 to explain the differences found in the drag polars. The results will demonstrate optimum winglet design for low Reynold’s number flight regimes and show the utility of using computational fluid dynamics for such a study.

Arizona Space Grant Award