Abstract Title

Changes in Performance Parameters of Solid Rocket Motors as They Increase in Size

Faculty Mentor Name

Brenda Haven

Format Preference

Poster

Abstract

In order to successfully design, build, and launch a solid rocket capable of surpassing the internationally-recognized boundary of space, 100 kilometers, the Propulsion Team will have to manufacture one of the largest amateur rocket motors ever made. To accomplish this goal, the team will design and test a series of scaled motors, including a six-inch diameter motor, an eight-inch diameter motor, and the final spaceflight motor, estimated to be roughly ten inches in diameter. To complete tests of all three motors, the team must design, construct, and test the motor case and its respective components, the nozzle, and the actual motor itself. In the case of the spaceflight vehicle, the motor will be roughly 300 pounds of ammonium perchlorate composite propellant that will power the rocket to speeds over Mach 5 in under fifteen seconds. The team hopes that with successful motor testing and acquisition of data, trends in the behavior and performance of solid rocket motors as they increase in size can be identified. It is known that the relationship between motor size and performance parameters (total impulse, thrust, and burn rate) is not linear. For this reason, the team expects to encounter and overcome the challenges of designing motors that are scaled in size. In the future, this data can be used to simplify the process of designing a rocket motor that can generally fluctuate in size and diameter without a significant loss in performance.

Poster Presentation

IGNITE GRANT AWARD

Location

AC1-ATRIUM

Start Date

4-8-2016 1:00 PM

End Date

4-8-2016 3:00 PM

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Apr 8th, 1:00 PM Apr 8th, 3:00 PM

Changes in Performance Parameters of Solid Rocket Motors as They Increase in Size

AC1-ATRIUM

In order to successfully design, build, and launch a solid rocket capable of surpassing the internationally-recognized boundary of space, 100 kilometers, the Propulsion Team will have to manufacture one of the largest amateur rocket motors ever made. To accomplish this goal, the team will design and test a series of scaled motors, including a six-inch diameter motor, an eight-inch diameter motor, and the final spaceflight motor, estimated to be roughly ten inches in diameter. To complete tests of all three motors, the team must design, construct, and test the motor case and its respective components, the nozzle, and the actual motor itself. In the case of the spaceflight vehicle, the motor will be roughly 300 pounds of ammonium perchlorate composite propellant that will power the rocket to speeds over Mach 5 in under fifteen seconds. The team hopes that with successful motor testing and acquisition of data, trends in the behavior and performance of solid rocket motors as they increase in size can be identified. It is known that the relationship between motor size and performance parameters (total impulse, thrust, and burn rate) is not linear. For this reason, the team expects to encounter and overcome the challenges of designing motors that are scaled in size. In the future, this data can be used to simplify the process of designing a rocket motor that can generally fluctuate in size and diameter without a significant loss in performance.

Poster Presentation

IGNITE GRANT AWARD