Abstract Title

Eagle Robotics Fire-Fighting Robot

Faculty Mentor Name

Douglas R. Isenberg and Stephen Bruder

Format Preference

Demonstration

Abstract

The Eagle Robotics team has designed and built a robotic system to participate in the Trinity College Fire-Fighting Home Robot competition. The competition challenges teams of students to create a fully autonomous robot capable of starting at the sound of an alarm, navigating through a random maze of rooms, locating a lit candle, and extinguishing the flame. The team has implemented a variety of sensors that allow the robot to accurately navigate the maze in search of the fire. A 360o laser distance scanner allows the robot to track its location and orientation while scanning the environment for any obstacles that may be present. An array of infrared (IR) sensors continuously monitors light intensity to indicate the presence and direction of the fire relative to the robot. Finally, a servo controlled valve extinguishes the fire using compressed CO2. The competition poses an additional challenge by scoring teams based upon the ability to return to the starting position once the fire is extinguished. This is made possible through an advanced control algorithm that not only tracks the position, but stores the location as a digital map and allows the robot to achieve localization. Returning to the start location becomes as simple as following the map in reverse.

Demonstration

EAGLE PRIZE AWARD

Location

AC1-ATRIUM

Start Date

4-8-2016 1:00 PM

End Date

4-8-2016 3:00 PM

Share

COinS
 
Apr 8th, 1:00 PM Apr 8th, 3:00 PM

Eagle Robotics Fire-Fighting Robot

AC1-ATRIUM

The Eagle Robotics team has designed and built a robotic system to participate in the Trinity College Fire-Fighting Home Robot competition. The competition challenges teams of students to create a fully autonomous robot capable of starting at the sound of an alarm, navigating through a random maze of rooms, locating a lit candle, and extinguishing the flame. The team has implemented a variety of sensors that allow the robot to accurately navigate the maze in search of the fire. A 360o laser distance scanner allows the robot to track its location and orientation while scanning the environment for any obstacles that may be present. An array of infrared (IR) sensors continuously monitors light intensity to indicate the presence and direction of the fire relative to the robot. Finally, a servo controlled valve extinguishes the fire using compressed CO2. The competition poses an additional challenge by scoring teams based upon the ability to return to the starting position once the fire is extinguished. This is made possible through an advanced control algorithm that not only tracks the position, but stores the location as a digital map and allows the robot to achieve localization. Returning to the start location becomes as simple as following the map in reverse.

Demonstration

EAGLE PRIZE AWARD