Abstract Title

Analysis of Response Procedures to CBRN Attacks in US

Faculty Mentor Name

Tyrone Groh

Format Preference

Oral and Poster Presentation

Abstract

The goal of our research is to gather data on both emerging and established chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) threats in the US homeland, with a primary emphasis on non-state actors. The end goal is to provide a risk assessment as well as a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis of the attacks that pose the greatest threat. This will be done by using open source research and analysis techniques as well as applying relevant coursework in terrorism and security, particularly threat and risk assessment techniques. The research will likely examine the difference between the threats the US faces from traditional actors compared to the new threat posed by homegrown terror and criminal groups. Due to the nature of the topic, there will also likely be a cursory examination of current foreign and domestic US policy, as it pertains to security concerns. The research has a short deadline, but I foresee the potential for it to be continued in an expanded format in the fall of 2016.

Poster Presentation

Invited Oral Presentation

Location

AC1-ATRIUM

Start Date

4-8-2016 1:00 PM

End Date

4-8-2016 3:00 PM

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Apr 8th, 1:00 PM Apr 8th, 3:00 PM

Analysis of Response Procedures to CBRN Attacks in US

AC1-ATRIUM

The goal of our research is to gather data on both emerging and established chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) threats in the US homeland, with a primary emphasis on non-state actors. The end goal is to provide a risk assessment as well as a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis of the attacks that pose the greatest threat. This will be done by using open source research and analysis techniques as well as applying relevant coursework in terrorism and security, particularly threat and risk assessment techniques. The research will likely examine the difference between the threats the US faces from traditional actors compared to the new threat posed by homegrown terror and criminal groups. Due to the nature of the topic, there will also likely be a cursory examination of current foreign and domestic US policy, as it pertains to security concerns. The research has a short deadline, but I foresee the potential for it to be continued in an expanded format in the fall of 2016.

Poster Presentation

Invited Oral Presentation