Abstract Title

Academic Program Meeting: College of Engineering

Authors' Class Standing

Senior

Faculty Mentor Name

John M. Pavlina, Iancopo Gentilini, and Rick Mangum

Format Preference

Oral Presentation

Abstract

Sarah Pearson, senior in Electrical Engineering, gave a presentation at the College of Engineering Academic Program Meeting, and discussed life as an engineering student. The posters she discussed included:

1. Developing Communication Link Analysis Tools (with Ashley Villa; under the direction of John M. Pavlina) - What good is a satellite if we are not able to communicate with it? Over the last few years there has been an increase in the number of satellites being put into orbit. These satellites are typically CubeSats, which are ten centimeter cube satellites that are placed into low Earth orbit. These satellites offer a low-cost platform for universities to perform experiments in space. One key component of the satellite’s design is the communication system. Without an adequate communication system, a communication link between the satellite and a ground station is nearly impossible. Through development of analysis methods that can be used during the design phase, investigation and refinement may be performed prior to building or launch. Two tools being utilized for analysis are ANSYS HFSS and STK. ANSYS FHSS allows for 3D modeling of the antenna’s radiation pattern. The patterns can then be analyzed for directionality and strength based upon the location on the satellite. STK is used to model communications of the satellite once it is in orbit. The orbit and parameters such as tumble can be simulated to determine when the satellite has line of sight communication. From line of sight a full link budget can be calculated as well. The resultant tools and methods developed for performing communication link analysis will be able to be used for future projects as well. Future communication designs can be modeled and simulated in order to ensure performance and refine the design.

Ignite Grant Award, Poster Presentation, Invited Oral Presentation

2. Development of a Walking Robotic Hexapod Platform (with Magnus Bergman, Davis Fischer, Kevin Horn, Evan Kline, Trentin Post, Steven Rudrich, Mariah Sampson, Kristin Sandager, and David Olson; under the direction of Iancopo Gentilini and Rick Mangum) - The purpose of this project was to design and build a robot capable of competing in the 2017 RoboGames Walker Challenge and interfacing with the optionally attached manipulator. The competition consists of a 3-meterlong course covered with various objects to create an unstable surface, which the hexapod must be capable of traversing quickly. The hexapod must also be capable of interfacing with the attachable manipulator, mechanically and electrically, and communicating via software. While this robotic hexapod has been designed to complete a specific task, the long term intent is for this project to become a prototype for future projects. There are several applications in which a walking mobile robot would be more useful than a wheeled one. Walking robots are capable of navigating more treacherous terrain, such as stairs or rubble in a condemned or burning building. Additionally, hexapods can utilize a variety of gaits which allows them to optimize their movement. A wave gait offers the most amount of stability and least amount of speed with five legs always in contact with the ground, a tripedal gait offers a moderate amount of stability and speed with three legs always in contact with the ground, and a bipedal gait offers the least amount of stability and most speed with two legs in contact with the ground. This project implements a tripedal gait to allow for quick completion of the Walker Challenge while also maintaining mechanical stability.

Eagle Prize Award, Poster Presentation and Demonstration

Location

Activity Center

Start Date

4-1-2017 9:45 AM

End Date

4-1-2017 11:00 AM

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Apr 1st, 9:45 AM Apr 1st, 11:00 AM

Academic Program Meeting: College of Engineering

Activity Center

Sarah Pearson, senior in Electrical Engineering, gave a presentation at the College of Engineering Academic Program Meeting, and discussed life as an engineering student. The posters she discussed included:

1. Developing Communication Link Analysis Tools (with Ashley Villa; under the direction of John M. Pavlina) - What good is a satellite if we are not able to communicate with it? Over the last few years there has been an increase in the number of satellites being put into orbit. These satellites are typically CubeSats, which are ten centimeter cube satellites that are placed into low Earth orbit. These satellites offer a low-cost platform for universities to perform experiments in space. One key component of the satellite’s design is the communication system. Without an adequate communication system, a communication link between the satellite and a ground station is nearly impossible. Through development of analysis methods that can be used during the design phase, investigation and refinement may be performed prior to building or launch. Two tools being utilized for analysis are ANSYS HFSS and STK. ANSYS FHSS allows for 3D modeling of the antenna’s radiation pattern. The patterns can then be analyzed for directionality and strength based upon the location on the satellite. STK is used to model communications of the satellite once it is in orbit. The orbit and parameters such as tumble can be simulated to determine when the satellite has line of sight communication. From line of sight a full link budget can be calculated as well. The resultant tools and methods developed for performing communication link analysis will be able to be used for future projects as well. Future communication designs can be modeled and simulated in order to ensure performance and refine the design.

Ignite Grant Award, Poster Presentation, Invited Oral Presentation

2. Development of a Walking Robotic Hexapod Platform (with Magnus Bergman, Davis Fischer, Kevin Horn, Evan Kline, Trentin Post, Steven Rudrich, Mariah Sampson, Kristin Sandager, and David Olson; under the direction of Iancopo Gentilini and Rick Mangum) - The purpose of this project was to design and build a robot capable of competing in the 2017 RoboGames Walker Challenge and interfacing with the optionally attached manipulator. The competition consists of a 3-meterlong course covered with various objects to create an unstable surface, which the hexapod must be capable of traversing quickly. The hexapod must also be capable of interfacing with the attachable manipulator, mechanically and electrically, and communicating via software. While this robotic hexapod has been designed to complete a specific task, the long term intent is for this project to become a prototype for future projects. There are several applications in which a walking mobile robot would be more useful than a wheeled one. Walking robots are capable of navigating more treacherous terrain, such as stairs or rubble in a condemned or burning building. Additionally, hexapods can utilize a variety of gaits which allows them to optimize their movement. A wave gait offers the most amount of stability and least amount of speed with five legs always in contact with the ground, a tripedal gait offers a moderate amount of stability and speed with three legs always in contact with the ground, and a bipedal gait offers the least amount of stability and most speed with two legs in contact with the ground. This project implements a tripedal gait to allow for quick completion of the Walker Challenge while also maintaining mechanical stability.

Eagle Prize Award, Poster Presentation and Demonstration