Faculty Mentor Name

Timothy Holt and Jacqueline Luedtke

Format Preference

Poster

Abstract

During the fall academic term of 2016, an opportunity arose through the College of Aviation to serve as an undergraduate research assistant. Through discussion with faculty mentors, it was decided that a severely overlooked aspect of the aviation industry was survivors of hypoxia, especially in the less regulated general aviation community. The problem this study addresses is the uncertainty of the common circumstances that general aviation pilots find themselves in that create a hypoxic state, as well as whether or not that pilot reported the occurrence to the proper establishments. The results of this study showed not only those that were impacted the greatest by hypoxia, but also a caring concern for reporting these events so that the general aviation community may learn from it and evolve their training as necessary. This study was significant in that a common topic, such as hypoxia, could be applied in a way that contributed to the general aviation community to such a tall degree. Beyond the study results, his experience has been educational about the applied process of launching a research project, the Institutional Review Board process, and aided in building confidence through presentations, and a sense of service through outreach events.

Ignite Grant Award

Location

AC1-ATRIUM

Start Date

3-31-2017 11:00 AM

End Date

3-31-2017 3:00 PM

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Mar 31st, 11:00 AM Mar 31st, 3:00 PM

Undergraduate Research on General Aviation Hypoxia: A Student’s Perspective

AC1-ATRIUM

During the fall academic term of 2016, an opportunity arose through the College of Aviation to serve as an undergraduate research assistant. Through discussion with faculty mentors, it was decided that a severely overlooked aspect of the aviation industry was survivors of hypoxia, especially in the less regulated general aviation community. The problem this study addresses is the uncertainty of the common circumstances that general aviation pilots find themselves in that create a hypoxic state, as well as whether or not that pilot reported the occurrence to the proper establishments. The results of this study showed not only those that were impacted the greatest by hypoxia, but also a caring concern for reporting these events so that the general aviation community may learn from it and evolve their training as necessary. This study was significant in that a common topic, such as hypoxia, could be applied in a way that contributed to the general aviation community to such a tall degree. Beyond the study results, his experience has been educational about the applied process of launching a research project, the Institutional Review Board process, and aided in building confidence through presentations, and a sense of service through outreach events.

Ignite Grant Award