Abstract Title

Unsafe Pedestrian Behaviors: A Comparative Analysis Between Elementary and Middle School Students

Faculty Mentor Name

Jonathan M. Gallimore

Format Preference

Poster

Abstract

In 2013 according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 21 % of children (individuals ≤ 14 years old) were killed in auto-pedestrian accidents. Children accounted for 5 % of pedestrian fatalities and approximately 15 % of pedestrian injuries. Children’s unsafe pedestrian behaviors create concern about student safety among teachers and parents across the country. This study investigated whether children in elementary or middle school are more likely to commit unsafe pedestrian behaviors. It was anticipated that a child’s developmental stage influenced the number and type of unsafe pedestrian behaviors. Two neighboring schools in Yavapai County, Arizona were observed over a three week period for 30 minutes before and after school. A modified version of the procedure developed by Suminski and Colleagues was used to collect data about the following unsafe pedestrian behaviors: talking to a friend, looking down, distractions due to inanimate objects, jay walking, horseplay, and running. A Chi-Square test of independence was conducted on the number and type of unsafe pedestrian behaviors between elementary and middle school students. The findings indicated that there was a relationship between a child’s developmental stage and the amount and type of unsafe pedestrian behaviors. These results imply that administrators and parents should consider pedestrian education as well as adult oversight to increase safe pedestrian behaviors among school aged children. Through increasing safe pedestrian behaviors, fewer school aged children may become victims of auto-pedestrian injuries and fatalities.

Location

AC1-ATRIUM

Start Date

3-31-2017 11:00 AM

End Date

3-31-2017 3:00 PM

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Mar 31st, 11:00 AM Mar 31st, 3:00 PM

Unsafe Pedestrian Behaviors: A Comparative Analysis Between Elementary and Middle School Students

AC1-ATRIUM

In 2013 according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 21 % of children (individuals ≤ 14 years old) were killed in auto-pedestrian accidents. Children accounted for 5 % of pedestrian fatalities and approximately 15 % of pedestrian injuries. Children’s unsafe pedestrian behaviors create concern about student safety among teachers and parents across the country. This study investigated whether children in elementary or middle school are more likely to commit unsafe pedestrian behaviors. It was anticipated that a child’s developmental stage influenced the number and type of unsafe pedestrian behaviors. Two neighboring schools in Yavapai County, Arizona were observed over a three week period for 30 minutes before and after school. A modified version of the procedure developed by Suminski and Colleagues was used to collect data about the following unsafe pedestrian behaviors: talking to a friend, looking down, distractions due to inanimate objects, jay walking, horseplay, and running. A Chi-Square test of independence was conducted on the number and type of unsafe pedestrian behaviors between elementary and middle school students. The findings indicated that there was a relationship between a child’s developmental stage and the amount and type of unsafe pedestrian behaviors. These results imply that administrators and parents should consider pedestrian education as well as adult oversight to increase safe pedestrian behaviors among school aged children. Through increasing safe pedestrian behaviors, fewer school aged children may become victims of auto-pedestrian injuries and fatalities.