Abstract Title

Computing and Detecting Gravitational Waves from Core Collapse Supernovae

Faculty Mentor Name

Michele Zanolin and Marek Szczepanczyk

Format Preference

Poster

Abstract

The discovery of gravitational waves marked the beginning of a new era of astronomy. On Feb 11, 2016, LIGO reported the observation of the first signal from the merger of two black holes. Another black hole merger was reported later in May 2016, and even more detections are expected from this family of sources. The next family of sources that could revolutionize the field are Supernovae, the explosions that mark the end of large stars. This project will primarily focus on the numerical modeling of these sources and on optimizing the algorithms that search for these signals in the data collected by laser interferometers.

Location

AC1-ATRIUM

Start Date

3-31-2017 11:00 AM

End Date

3-31-2017 3:00 PM

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Mar 31st, 11:00 AM Mar 31st, 3:00 PM

Computing and Detecting Gravitational Waves from Core Collapse Supernovae

AC1-ATRIUM

The discovery of gravitational waves marked the beginning of a new era of astronomy. On Feb 11, 2016, LIGO reported the observation of the first signal from the merger of two black holes. Another black hole merger was reported later in May 2016, and even more detections are expected from this family of sources. The next family of sources that could revolutionize the field are Supernovae, the explosions that mark the end of large stars. This project will primarily focus on the numerical modeling of these sources and on optimizing the algorithms that search for these signals in the data collected by laser interferometers.