Event Title

Acquisition of Long-Duration, Low-Gravity Slosh Data Utilizing Existing ISS Equipment (SPHERES) for Calibration of CFD Models of Coupled Fluid-Vehicle Behavior

Location

Cocoa Beach

Start Date

7-12-2012 3:00 PM

Description

Liquid propellant slosh occurring during orbital maneuvers of a rocket’s upper-stage may adversely affect vehicle performance. During orbital maneuvers the acceleration levels of an upper-stage vary substantially and significant liquid sloshing events may occur which can affect the intended trajectory of the vehicle as well as influencing propellant and tank thermal management. Mission planners require accurate and validated simulation tools to understand and predict the effects of slosh on a mission and therefore there is a need to better understand and model liquid slosh in micro-gravity.

This project aims to bridge the gap of missing data by designing a Slosh Platform capable of acquiring long-duration lowgravity slosh data on the International Space Station. The slosh data acquired will facilitate calibration and validation of CFD models. The proposed experimental platform consists of a tank partially filled with water, inertial measurement units to measure the dynamics of the system, as well as cameras to image the fluid distribution in the tank. The Slosh Platform utilizes the existing ISS SPHERES apparatus, which will be used to maneuver the tank through a variety of trajectories. To mimic the motions of actual upper-stage rocket maneuvers, a scaling analysis based on relevant non-dimensional parameters is performed and applied to the design and operation of the Slosh platform onboard ISS. The proposed motion profiles to be conducted by the Slosh Platform on ISS were verified using a CFD tool to assess the magnitude of fluid slosh and its impact on the attitude change of the platform. The CFD tools predict that the liquid slosh within the tank of the Slosh Platform will cause the trajectory of the apparatus to deviate in a measurable way as compared with a rigid, non-sloshing system. Currently the experimental design has passed NASA’s Critical Design Review and manufacture of the first test article is in progress. The Slosh experiment is scheduled to fly to the ISS.

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Dec 7th, 3:00 PM

Acquisition of Long-Duration, Low-Gravity Slosh Data Utilizing Existing ISS Equipment (SPHERES) for Calibration of CFD Models of Coupled Fluid-Vehicle Behavior

Cocoa Beach

Liquid propellant slosh occurring during orbital maneuvers of a rocket’s upper-stage may adversely affect vehicle performance. During orbital maneuvers the acceleration levels of an upper-stage vary substantially and significant liquid sloshing events may occur which can affect the intended trajectory of the vehicle as well as influencing propellant and tank thermal management. Mission planners require accurate and validated simulation tools to understand and predict the effects of slosh on a mission and therefore there is a need to better understand and model liquid slosh in micro-gravity.

This project aims to bridge the gap of missing data by designing a Slosh Platform capable of acquiring long-duration lowgravity slosh data on the International Space Station. The slosh data acquired will facilitate calibration and validation of CFD models. The proposed experimental platform consists of a tank partially filled with water, inertial measurement units to measure the dynamics of the system, as well as cameras to image the fluid distribution in the tank. The Slosh Platform utilizes the existing ISS SPHERES apparatus, which will be used to maneuver the tank through a variety of trajectories. To mimic the motions of actual upper-stage rocket maneuvers, a scaling analysis based on relevant non-dimensional parameters is performed and applied to the design and operation of the Slosh platform onboard ISS. The proposed motion profiles to be conducted by the Slosh Platform on ISS were verified using a CFD tool to assess the magnitude of fluid slosh and its impact on the attitude change of the platform. The CFD tools predict that the liquid slosh within the tank of the Slosh Platform will cause the trajectory of the apparatus to deviate in a measurable way as compared with a rigid, non-sloshing system. Currently the experimental design has passed NASA’s Critical Design Review and manufacture of the first test article is in progress. The Slosh experiment is scheduled to fly to the ISS.