Event Title

T1-D: A Case Study Comparing Student Satisfaction And Attainment Of Course Outcomes When Passive And Active Pedagogical Approaches Were Used To Teach Global Logistics To Industrial Distribution And Logistics Students

Start Date

5-3-2018 10:00 AM

Description

This paper presents an exploratory study of the use of passive and active pedagogies to teach global logistics to industrial distribution and logistics students. The purpose of the study was to determine whether the type of teaching method (1) impacts student engagement and course interest, and (2) improves student understanding and application of logistics principles. Course evolution is described over an eleven-year period. Instructor and student roles and types of assignments are discussed. The paper summarizes student satisfaction and achievement of course outcomes based on administered surveys, course evaluations, examination and assignment performance, informal feedback, and course assessments. The results indicate that the majority of students preferred active learning, but desired that some passive teaching be retained. Compared to passive methods, active teaching helped students to improve their understanding of logistics. The study provides a model for academics interested in designing courses to teach logistics in an international context.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 5th, 10:00 AM

T1-D: A Case Study Comparing Student Satisfaction And Attainment Of Course Outcomes When Passive And Active Pedagogical Approaches Were Used To Teach Global Logistics To Industrial Distribution And Logistics Students

This paper presents an exploratory study of the use of passive and active pedagogies to teach global logistics to industrial distribution and logistics students. The purpose of the study was to determine whether the type of teaching method (1) impacts student engagement and course interest, and (2) improves student understanding and application of logistics principles. Course evolution is described over an eleven-year period. Instructor and student roles and types of assignments are discussed. The paper summarizes student satisfaction and achievement of course outcomes based on administered surveys, course evaluations, examination and assignment performance, informal feedback, and course assessments. The results indicate that the majority of students preferred active learning, but desired that some passive teaching be retained. Compared to passive methods, active teaching helped students to improve their understanding of logistics. The study provides a model for academics interested in designing courses to teach logistics in an international context.