Is this project an undergraduate, graduate, or faculty project?

Undergraduate

individual

Authors' Class Standing

Daniel Lee, Junior

Lead Presenter's Name

Daniel Lee

Faculty Mentor Name

Nikolas Macchiarella

Abstract

When conducting photogrammetry using aircraft, there are limits as to where it can go and what it can do. After visiting the Republic of Kosovo and working with a Cultural Heritage without Borders, the process in which one should collect images and scans for preservation purposes was brought clear. Using small unmanned aerial systems proved to be a much better alternative when compared with traditional aircraft. Using multiple UAS over a variety of different terrains, it was discovered that UAS were a much more feasible option. The purpose of this research is to help cultural heritage organizations collect images for preservation purposes of historic sites throughout Kosovo, specifically the kullas. The main type was the DJI Phantom 4 Pro. The software used was the flying software from DJI as well as Pix4D. While Pix4D allows UAS to be flown in patterns that are generally used in imaging buildings and the landscape, using them to image historic sites for preservation purposes is still new. This research tested the ability of UAS to fly different terrains to include cities, small towns, and small villages with different elevations. With the help of CHwB, it was concluded that sUAS are better equipped to conduct imagery work for preservation purposes. While some conditions were against the use of UAS, the benefits far outweighed the cons. This research discovered that while manned aircraft could do the same work, they are limited. While both the UAS and manned aircraft have restrictions, restrictions placed on UAS allow it to be used in more confined areas. With CHwB guidance, it was decided that for preservation of the kullas, UAS were to be used over manned aircraft to allow for better imagery as well as cheaper and faster return on the product. In the future, for the process of conducting scans on historical sites, the transition to UAS from manned aircraft is very prominent. With the ease of use for UAS, along with the ability to relocate, it allows for faster return rates on the imagery collected and to be more cost effective. This research is the beginning of the start of the transition from manned to unmanned for aerial photography. This research is the start of preserving not only historical buildings, but also areas that are being damaged through man-made disasters.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

Yes, Ignite Grant

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Process of using Small Unmanned Aerial Systems using Photogrammetry for Preservation

When conducting photogrammetry using aircraft, there are limits as to where it can go and what it can do. After visiting the Republic of Kosovo and working with a Cultural Heritage without Borders, the process in which one should collect images and scans for preservation purposes was brought clear. Using small unmanned aerial systems proved to be a much better alternative when compared with traditional aircraft. Using multiple UAS over a variety of different terrains, it was discovered that UAS were a much more feasible option. The purpose of this research is to help cultural heritage organizations collect images for preservation purposes of historic sites throughout Kosovo, specifically the kullas. The main type was the DJI Phantom 4 Pro. The software used was the flying software from DJI as well as Pix4D. While Pix4D allows UAS to be flown in patterns that are generally used in imaging buildings and the landscape, using them to image historic sites for preservation purposes is still new. This research tested the ability of UAS to fly different terrains to include cities, small towns, and small villages with different elevations. With the help of CHwB, it was concluded that sUAS are better equipped to conduct imagery work for preservation purposes. While some conditions were against the use of UAS, the benefits far outweighed the cons. This research discovered that while manned aircraft could do the same work, they are limited. While both the UAS and manned aircraft have restrictions, restrictions placed on UAS allow it to be used in more confined areas. With CHwB guidance, it was decided that for preservation of the kullas, UAS were to be used over manned aircraft to allow for better imagery as well as cheaper and faster return on the product. In the future, for the process of conducting scans on historical sites, the transition to UAS from manned aircraft is very prominent. With the ease of use for UAS, along with the ability to relocate, it allows for faster return rates on the imagery collected and to be more cost effective. This research is the beginning of the start of the transition from manned to unmanned for aerial photography. This research is the start of preserving not only historical buildings, but also areas that are being damaged through man-made disasters.