Author Information

Hailee ClarkFollow

Is this project an undergraduate, graduate, or faculty project?

Undergraduate

individual

Authors' Class Standing

Hailee Clark, Senior

Lead Presenter's Name

Hailee Clark

Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Murray

Abstract

This research project evaluates the Rohingyan genocide through the lens of Murray’s theory of the anti-nation. Murray (2015) states that the anti-nation is defined by five characteristics- homeland claims, religion, alliances, range of economic and social backgrounds, and historical animosity. This research shows that the case of the Rohingyan genocide supports Murray’s theory and proves it continues to fit in twenty-first century genocide. This research was conducted through an evaluation of articles and interviews detailing Burmese culture, victim accounts of the genocide, state laws, and extremist speeches delivered by Buddhist monks. Along with supporting Murray’s theory, this study will connect literature regarding modernist national theory to the conflict. Of the existing research, very little focuses on the type of nationalist movement the Burmese have created. This research shows that many Buddhists in the Rakhine state have shown a blatant disregard for - or developed an extreme interpretation of - their religious ideology and the lasting impact that British colonialism has had on Myanmar.

Murray, E. (2015). Disrupting pathways to genocide: The process of ideological radicalization. UK: Palgrave Macmillan.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

No

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The Rohingyan Genocide and the Anti-Nation

This research project evaluates the Rohingyan genocide through the lens of Murray’s theory of the anti-nation. Murray (2015) states that the anti-nation is defined by five characteristics- homeland claims, religion, alliances, range of economic and social backgrounds, and historical animosity. This research shows that the case of the Rohingyan genocide supports Murray’s theory and proves it continues to fit in twenty-first century genocide. This research was conducted through an evaluation of articles and interviews detailing Burmese culture, victim accounts of the genocide, state laws, and extremist speeches delivered by Buddhist monks. Along with supporting Murray’s theory, this study will connect literature regarding modernist national theory to the conflict. Of the existing research, very little focuses on the type of nationalist movement the Burmese have created. This research shows that many Buddhists in the Rakhine state have shown a blatant disregard for - or developed an extreme interpretation of - their religious ideology and the lasting impact that British colonialism has had on Myanmar.

Murray, E. (2015). Disrupting pathways to genocide: The process of ideological radicalization. UK: Palgrave Macmillan.