Abstract Title

Haptic Feedback as a Treatment for Position Dependent Snoring

Is this project an undergraduate, graduate, or faculty project?

Undergraduate

group

10-minute Oral Presentation

Authors' Class Standing

Matt Kukuvka, Senior Imani Murph, Graduate Student

Lead Presenter's Name

Matt Kukuvka

Faculty Mentor Name

Jon French

Abstract

Severe snoring is much more harmful than many people realize. Snoring leads to reduction in sleep duration and quality, increased daytime fatigue, and increased risk of sleep apnea. Many snorers do not seek treatment until their problem has worsened to the extent that their loss of sleep and daytime fatigue are debilitating. Most snoring is position dependent and is most prominent while sleeping on one’s back. The present study explores a way to reduce snoring and its negative consequences. A haptic feedback device was developed to train users to sleep on their sides, rather than on their back. This will allow their airways to remain open more than while sleeping on their back. The device consists of a belt which detects when the user is positioned on their back and provides gentle, haptic feedback until he or she repositions to the side. Participants were monitored first without, and then with the device and various data were collected. These data included actigraphy, sound recording (in order to quantify the snoring), and subjective daytime fatigue scores. Also tested was a new sleep application developed for smartwatches, with the capability to collect sleep quality and daytime fatigue data.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

Yes, Spark Grant

Share

COinS
 

Haptic Feedback as a Treatment for Position Dependent Snoring

Severe snoring is much more harmful than many people realize. Snoring leads to reduction in sleep duration and quality, increased daytime fatigue, and increased risk of sleep apnea. Many snorers do not seek treatment until their problem has worsened to the extent that their loss of sleep and daytime fatigue are debilitating. Most snoring is position dependent and is most prominent while sleeping on one’s back. The present study explores a way to reduce snoring and its negative consequences. A haptic feedback device was developed to train users to sleep on their sides, rather than on their back. This will allow their airways to remain open more than while sleeping on their back. The device consists of a belt which detects when the user is positioned on their back and provides gentle, haptic feedback until he or she repositions to the side. Participants were monitored first without, and then with the device and various data were collected. These data included actigraphy, sound recording (in order to quantify the snoring), and subjective daytime fatigue scores. Also tested was a new sleep application developed for smartwatches, with the capability to collect sleep quality and daytime fatigue data.