Is this project an undergraduate, graduate, or faculty project?

Undergraduate

group

Poster Session

Authors' Class Standing

Collin Topolski, Senior Kayla Hollis, Junior Janelle Hicks,

Lead Presenter's Name

Collin Topolski

Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Karen Gaines; Dr. Hugo Castillo

Abstract

A largely unknown topic is how reduced gravity (hypogravity) affects organisms and their functionalities at a cellular level. A common method to conduct initial hypogravity testing is using a device known as a clinostat. Essentially, a culture of microorganisms or plant seeds can be placed at a specific radius perpendicular to the axis of rotation and rotated at a set RPM to simulate the experience of being in the lowered gravity environment. An issue with purchasing any commercial versions is the cost being very large for a customized system. To overcome this, multiple iterations have been developed to increasingly improve the system. Currently, the entire framework is 3D printed and manages to operate experimental and control conditions in one unit. Because of the flexibility of the design, customized parts are very easy to develop. This results in a fast and low-cost turnaround for new tube holders to account for any desired experiment. Future experiments will be conducted on Arthrospira Platensis, Abaena, and varying plant seeds to estimate their viability in reduced gravity environments (e.g. Martian or Microgravity).

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

No

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Development of a 3D Printed Clinostat

A largely unknown topic is how reduced gravity (hypogravity) affects organisms and their functionalities at a cellular level. A common method to conduct initial hypogravity testing is using a device known as a clinostat. Essentially, a culture of microorganisms or plant seeds can be placed at a specific radius perpendicular to the axis of rotation and rotated at a set RPM to simulate the experience of being in the lowered gravity environment. An issue with purchasing any commercial versions is the cost being very large for a customized system. To overcome this, multiple iterations have been developed to increasingly improve the system. Currently, the entire framework is 3D printed and manages to operate experimental and control conditions in one unit. Because of the flexibility of the design, customized parts are very easy to develop. This results in a fast and low-cost turnaround for new tube holders to account for any desired experiment. Future experiments will be conducted on Arthrospira Platensis, Abaena, and varying plant seeds to estimate their viability in reduced gravity environments (e.g. Martian or Microgravity).

 

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