Author Information

Allison LarsenFollow

Is this project an undergraduate, graduate, or faculty project?

Undergraduate

group

Poster Session

Authors' Class Standing

Allison Larsen, Senior Katya Rivera, Junior

Lead Presenter's Name

Allison Larsen

Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Foram Madiyar

Abstract

There has been substantial social and environmental pressure for the efficient reutilization of agricultural and food industry residues. According to estimates from the Food and Agriculture Organization in the United States, 1-2 billion metric tons (Mt) of edible food produced for human consumption is wasted every year and among that statistic fruit processing industries contribute ~0.3-0.5 billion tons of waste. Pomace contains waste fractions such as skin peels, seeds, and pulp that could theoretically be an excellent substitute for feedstock for recovery of bioactive chemical compounds like lipids, pectin, flavonoids, and dietary fibers. However, these wastes are either incinerated or disposed of in landfills which is an expensive process and causes environmental pollution through the emission of gases like methane and carbon dioxide. Ultrahigh-pressure extraction (UPE) has been used for the isolation of biologically active components (BACs) from the whole plants. UPE has several advantages over the conventional procedures because it provides a higher extraction yield, shorter extraction time, lower energy consumption, and higher purity of the extracts. This study is focused on developing functional foods from the pomace extract and the long-term goal of this study is to establish the utility of UPE as a more efficient, economical, and industrially applicable technique for the extraction of BACs from different fruit pomace.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

No

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Harnessing the economic, nutritive and commercial potential of pomace employing principles of green chemistry by extraction of biologically active components (BACs) through ultrahigh- pressure extraction

There has been substantial social and environmental pressure for the efficient reutilization of agricultural and food industry residues. According to estimates from the Food and Agriculture Organization in the United States, 1-2 billion metric tons (Mt) of edible food produced for human consumption is wasted every year and among that statistic fruit processing industries contribute ~0.3-0.5 billion tons of waste. Pomace contains waste fractions such as skin peels, seeds, and pulp that could theoretically be an excellent substitute for feedstock for recovery of bioactive chemical compounds like lipids, pectin, flavonoids, and dietary fibers. However, these wastes are either incinerated or disposed of in landfills which is an expensive process and causes environmental pollution through the emission of gases like methane and carbon dioxide. Ultrahigh-pressure extraction (UPE) has been used for the isolation of biologically active components (BACs) from the whole plants. UPE has several advantages over the conventional procedures because it provides a higher extraction yield, shorter extraction time, lower energy consumption, and higher purity of the extracts. This study is focused on developing functional foods from the pomace extract and the long-term goal of this study is to establish the utility of UPE as a more efficient, economical, and industrially applicable technique for the extraction of BACs from different fruit pomace.

 

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