Author Information

Sebastian CoxFollow

Is this project an undergraduate, graduate, or faculty project?

Undergraduate

group

Poster Session

Authors' Class Standing

Sebastian Cox, Senior

Lead Presenter's Name

Sebastian Cox

Faculty Mentor Name

Francisco J. Franquiz

Abstract

A CubeSat payload is being designed to support an Embry-Riddle College of Arts and Sciences biological experiment. This experiment seeks to observe the effects of space radiation exposure on a cell population’s growth. To this end, the payload will be designed to carry 15 to 18 separate cell samples in an inoculated state into orbit. The cells will then be activated in sets of three every two weeks, allowing radiation damage to accumulate before later sample sets begin to grow. Throughout their lifetime, the payload will protect the cells from any other potential sources of damage besides radiation. Finally, the design will allow for spectrophotometry readings to be taken at regular intervals to determine the size of the cell population. Sample temperature and radiation readings will also be recorded. Once all cell samples are dead, the payload will continue to collect radiation data until the end of the satellite’s life. All data will be transmitted to Earth for analysis. The payload will occupy 4Us of a 6U CubeSat.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

Yes, Spark Grant

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CubeSat Payload to Explore the Effects of Space Radiation Exposure on Cell Population Growth

A CubeSat payload is being designed to support an Embry-Riddle College of Arts and Sciences biological experiment. This experiment seeks to observe the effects of space radiation exposure on a cell population’s growth. To this end, the payload will be designed to carry 15 to 18 separate cell samples in an inoculated state into orbit. The cells will then be activated in sets of three every two weeks, allowing radiation damage to accumulate before later sample sets begin to grow. Throughout their lifetime, the payload will protect the cells from any other potential sources of damage besides radiation. Finally, the design will allow for spectrophotometry readings to be taken at regular intervals to determine the size of the cell population. Sample temperature and radiation readings will also be recorded. Once all cell samples are dead, the payload will continue to collect radiation data until the end of the satellite’s life. All data will be transmitted to Earth for analysis. The payload will occupy 4Us of a 6U CubeSat.

 

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