Is this project an undergraduate, graduate, or faculty project?

Undergraduate

group

Poster Session; 5-minute Oral Presentation

Authors' Class Standing

Daniel Flores: Senior Harvey Waters: Senior Arka Das: Graduate Student

Lead Presenter's Name

Harvey L Waters Jr

Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Eduardo Divo

Abstract

The problem with current Ventricular Assist Devices is that the pump design imposes unnatural behavior to the flow of the blood such as stagnation and impingement regions due to the many moving parts, thus promoting the formation of blood clots. To solve this problem, a magneto hydromagnetic drive or MHD can replace the pump in the flow loop. MHD takes advantage of Lorenz’s force, which states that if a magnetic field is perpendicular to an electric field, a particle in the conducting fluid will experience a force orthogonal to both the magnetic and electric field thus to propelling the blood. The result is a unrestricted flow propelled by a electromagnetic force. The first step is to design and build a simple, low cost, and effective electromagnetic flow sensor that is easy to operate and integrates well with a bench-top flow loop. This loop is made up of half inch vinyl tubing, a voltage pump, and a commercial electromagnetic flow sensor. The next step is to use the knowledge from the flow sensor to develop a magnetohydrodynamic drive.

The flow sensor design and operation are based on the magnetic flow sensing principle which is built upon Faraday’s Law. This law states that the voltage induced across any conductor as it moves orthogonally through a magnetic field is proportional to the velocity of that conductor. When applying this to a flow sensor, the resulting principle means that any conducting fluid flowing through a magnetic field will induce a voltage which can be read by two electrodes placed orthogonal to the magnetic field. Essentially, the job of the flow sensor is to read these voltage changes that are proportional to and arise from the changes in flow speed. After some post processing of the voltage readings the flow rate can be determined. To reduce the error in the system, the polarity of the magnetic field is changed at a certain rate. This changing field will produce two outputs for the readings of the induced voltages which can be subtracted to cancel out any external readings. Those external readings when taken out of the system will result in a proper flow rate value. After completing the flow sensor, the MHD design will be finalized using a 3D model finite element analysis done in COMSOL Multiphysics.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

No

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Magnetic Hydro-Dynamic Propulsion of Blood

The problem with current Ventricular Assist Devices is that the pump design imposes unnatural behavior to the flow of the blood such as stagnation and impingement regions due to the many moving parts, thus promoting the formation of blood clots. To solve this problem, a magneto hydromagnetic drive or MHD can replace the pump in the flow loop. MHD takes advantage of Lorenz’s force, which states that if a magnetic field is perpendicular to an electric field, a particle in the conducting fluid will experience a force orthogonal to both the magnetic and electric field thus to propelling the blood. The result is a unrestricted flow propelled by a electromagnetic force. The first step is to design and build a simple, low cost, and effective electromagnetic flow sensor that is easy to operate and integrates well with a bench-top flow loop. This loop is made up of half inch vinyl tubing, a voltage pump, and a commercial electromagnetic flow sensor. The next step is to use the knowledge from the flow sensor to develop a magnetohydrodynamic drive.

The flow sensor design and operation are based on the magnetic flow sensing principle which is built upon Faraday’s Law. This law states that the voltage induced across any conductor as it moves orthogonally through a magnetic field is proportional to the velocity of that conductor. When applying this to a flow sensor, the resulting principle means that any conducting fluid flowing through a magnetic field will induce a voltage which can be read by two electrodes placed orthogonal to the magnetic field. Essentially, the job of the flow sensor is to read these voltage changes that are proportional to and arise from the changes in flow speed. After some post processing of the voltage readings the flow rate can be determined. To reduce the error in the system, the polarity of the magnetic field is changed at a certain rate. This changing field will produce two outputs for the readings of the induced voltages which can be subtracted to cancel out any external readings. Those external readings when taken out of the system will result in a proper flow rate value. After completing the flow sensor, the MHD design will be finalized using a 3D model finite element analysis done in COMSOL Multiphysics.

 

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