Is this project an undergraduate, graduate, or faculty project?

Undergraduate

individual

Poster Session

Authors' Class Standing

Emily Jannace, Senior Scott Parr, PhD

Lead Presenter's Name

Emily Janance

Faculty Mentor Name

Scott Parr

Abstract

Resilient infrastructure is imperative especially following natural or manmade disasters. The ability to move food, water, and relief supplies using multiple modes of transportation to areas recently affected by major disasters is oftentimes very difficult. Following Hurricane Maria’s landfall on Puerto Rico in 2018, 10,000 shipping containers were stranded in just one port of Puerto Rico unable to traverse the island to reach those in need. The lack of resilient infrastructure caused a delay in repair to normalcy for the entire island and delayed supplies that were already late to their destination even longer.

The goal of this research is to model the elasticity of cargo arrival and departure under resilient infrastructure. The objective of this research is to determine the responsiveness of a mode of transportation to change under demand and restrictions. This model will be simulated in a hybrid microscopic-mesoscopic model using VISSIM. The individual ports within Puerto Rico will first be modelled microscopically. The cargo from these ports will then move along the major truck routes of the island that will be modelled mesoscopic level. Dwell time and ultimate arrival time from the time it arrives in the port to when it reaches its destination will additionally be examined. Its expected that a delay in final arrival time will still be seen; however, the delay time at the port and the delay time when the cargo reaches its final destination will not be linear. This research will help to bring improve well being to individuals of a society, increase public scientific literacy, improve national security, and enhance infrastructure for research and education.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

No

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The Use of Hybrid Modeling to Examine the Elasticity of Cargo Movement Following a Natural Disaster

Resilient infrastructure is imperative especially following natural or manmade disasters. The ability to move food, water, and relief supplies using multiple modes of transportation to areas recently affected by major disasters is oftentimes very difficult. Following Hurricane Maria’s landfall on Puerto Rico in 2018, 10,000 shipping containers were stranded in just one port of Puerto Rico unable to traverse the island to reach those in need. The lack of resilient infrastructure caused a delay in repair to normalcy for the entire island and delayed supplies that were already late to their destination even longer.

The goal of this research is to model the elasticity of cargo arrival and departure under resilient infrastructure. The objective of this research is to determine the responsiveness of a mode of transportation to change under demand and restrictions. This model will be simulated in a hybrid microscopic-mesoscopic model using VISSIM. The individual ports within Puerto Rico will first be modelled microscopically. The cargo from these ports will then move along the major truck routes of the island that will be modelled mesoscopic level. Dwell time and ultimate arrival time from the time it arrives in the port to when it reaches its destination will additionally be examined. Its expected that a delay in final arrival time will still be seen; however, the delay time at the port and the delay time when the cargo reaches its final destination will not be linear. This research will help to bring improve well being to individuals of a society, increase public scientific literacy, improve national security, and enhance infrastructure for research and education.

 

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