Is this project an undergraduate, graduate, or faculty project?

Graduate

group

Poster Session

Authors' Class Standing

Anastasia Diamond, Graduate Student Austin Smith, Graduate Student Collier Cambell, Graduate Student Taro Ito, Graduate Student Alex Chaparro, Asst Prof

Lead Presenter's Name

Anastasia Diamond

Faculty Mentor Name

Collier Campbell

Abstract

The ubiquity of advanced in-vehicle technologies for cars highlights the relative scarcity of comparable offerings for motorcycles despite the fact that many can be adapted for this mode of transportation. Aspects of Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) such as advanced rider assist technologies may increase the safety of motorcyclists. In this study, we surveyed motorcycle riders about the types of advance technologies their current bikes were equipped with, as well as, the primary motivation for purchasing the technology, and how they learned to use the technologies (if applicable). The most frequently reported technologies owned by riders were handle bar controls, engine brake controls, and cruise control. The primary motivation reported for using the technology was increased safety and improved riding capabilities. The riders were more likely to consult online resources (e.g., YouTube) instead of the manufacturer’s materials when learning about the advanced features of their bikes. While the accessibility of the information makes it easy to reference, the lack of standardization and validity of the online content could contribute to the potential misuse of the technology.

Did this research project receive funding support (Spark or Ignite Grants) from the Office of Undergraduate Research?

Yes, Spark Grant

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Rider Assist Technologies: Popular Types, Motivations for Use, and Information Sources Consulted by Users

The ubiquity of advanced in-vehicle technologies for cars highlights the relative scarcity of comparable offerings for motorcycles despite the fact that many can be adapted for this mode of transportation. Aspects of Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) such as advanced rider assist technologies may increase the safety of motorcyclists. In this study, we surveyed motorcycle riders about the types of advance technologies their current bikes were equipped with, as well as, the primary motivation for purchasing the technology, and how they learned to use the technologies (if applicable). The most frequently reported technologies owned by riders were handle bar controls, engine brake controls, and cruise control. The primary motivation reported for using the technology was increased safety and improved riding capabilities. The riders were more likely to consult online resources (e.g., YouTube) instead of the manufacturer’s materials when learning about the advanced features of their bikes. While the accessibility of the information makes it easy to reference, the lack of standardization and validity of the online content could contribute to the potential misuse of the technology.

 

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